COMMENTARY

Flash CGM Sustainably Reduces Acute Hospitalizations in T2D

Jean-Pierre Riveline, DO, PhD;  Mark Harmel, MPH, CDCES

Disclosures

October 21, 2022

This transcript has been edited for clarity.

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), especially flash CGM, is often prescribed to patients with diabetes, especially in those treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy.

We did a study to evaluate acute hospitalization for diabetes events in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with basal-only insulin therapy. With this Social Security database, we were able to individualize 6000 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with basal-only insulin therapy.

We made the comparison of the number of days of hospitalization 1 year before flash glucose monitoring prescription, and 1 and 2 years after this prescription. We observed a huge reduction of hospitalization for ketoacidosis, around 60%, and a 40% reduction in hospitalization for severe hypoglycemia 1 year after flash glucose monitoring. At 2 years after, we observed a 70% reduction of ketoacidosis, suggesting that this improvement is sustainable 2 years after.

We were able to evaluate the evolution of our population according to whether the prescription was given by a general healthcare practitioner or a specialist, and we observed the same reduction of hospitalization whichever the prescriber. We were also able to evaluate the evolution of the treatment of the patients. At 1 year and 2 years after, we observed a huge increase in patients treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy, suggesting that flash glucose monitoring is able to fight against clinical inertia.

This study strongly suggests that flash glucose monitoring is a tool able to improve clinical event hospitalization for ketoacidosis or severe hypoglycemia in patients living with type 2 diabetes treated with basal-only insulin therapy, whether it was a prescription from a general healthcare practitioner or a specialist. This improvement could help the physician fight against clinical inertia.

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