Date With Adult Model Leads to Testicular Cancer Diagnosis

Patricia McKnight

September 07, 2022

A former healthcare worker who is now pursuing a career in adult entertainment helped one of her regular clients toward a cancer diagnosis, after urging him to get checked out by a doctor.

Belle Grace

For 7 years, Belle Grace had been working with children and adults diagnosed with autism. But during the COVID-19 pandemic, like many other people, she began to look around for alternative streams of revenue.

In May 2020, Grace created a profile on the adult content subscription site OnlyFans.

"I was taking some time off of work and found myself on OnlyFans as a bit of a side hustle," said Grace. "It wasn't until I started earning five times more than my standard wage that I decided to go full-time and make that career change."

She soon built up a regular clientele, hosting intimate video chats.

While video chatting with one of her loyal subscribers, Grace noticed something different about his testicles. Hesitantly, she mentioned that one testicle was a lot larger than the other — a change she hadn't noticed before during their 2 years of interacting.

Grace says she was nervous about bringing up the subject with her subscriber. She suggested that he should see a doctor to have his testicles checked out, but her date didn't go right away.

Grace says he waited a couple of months to go in for a check-up because he was slightly embarrassed. When he finally went to the doctor, he was given a diagnosis of testicular cancer.

Although Grace says that the conversation with her subscriber was a bit awkward, she's happy she gathered the courage to bring it to his attention.

Testicular cancer is relatively rare, but it usually has a good prognosis — the survival rate is about 95%, according to Alexander Kutikov, MD, professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. Testicular cancer is relatively rare, but it usually has a good prognosis — the survival rate is about 95%, according to Alexander Kutikov, MD, professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

Kutikov emphasized that men shouldn't wait if they notice any changes in their genitals. The quicker they go see a doctor, the better the outcome is likely to be if it does turn out to be something serious.

For testicular cancer, "the treatment can be much more simple if it's caught early — avoiding chemotherapy and avoiding major surgery," Kutikov said.

"But even testicular cancers that present after they have spread can be cured. So a delay is suboptimal, but it's not as devastating as some other cancers," he added.

Most men who are diagnosed with testicular cancer present after noticing changes in the scrotum where one testicle feels and looks different from the other, Kutikov commented. In addition, there is usually a very firm mass or nodule that can be felt under the skin.

"Another common symptom is back pain, because testicular cancer can go to the lymph nodes in the back as well," he said.

Kutikov says it all comes down to being aware of your body and noticing any major changes.

Grace suggests that sexual intimacy offers an opportunity for noting physical changes, "because you and your sexual partner are able to see each other's bodies in the most intimate matter."

"People should be telling their partners if they notice any changes," she says, for example, on their skin, such as sores or rashes, or lumps under the skin. "Even a change in a mole could be essential for your partner's health," she said.

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