Elevated HDL-C Linked to Reduced Odds of Testing Positive for SARS-COV-2

Sarfaroj Khan 

Disclosures

April 12, 2021

Takeaway

  • Elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) levels were associated with reduced odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

  • High body mass index (BMI), type 2 diabetes (T2D), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and hyperlipidaemia were associated with increased odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

  • The effect of BMI, T2D and HbA1c were eliminated when controlling for HDL-C.

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest that baseline HDL-C level may be useful for stratifying SARS-CoV-2 infection risk and corroborates the emerging picture that elevated HDL-C may confer protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Study details

  • Study of 9005 participants from the UK Biobank who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 (1508 tested positive [cases]; 7497 tested negative [controls]).

  • Funding: National Institute of General Medicines and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Key results

  • Elevated HDL-C (OR, 0.845; 95% CI, 0.788-0.907) and ApoA-I (OR, 0.849; 95% CI, 0.793-0.910) levels were associated with reduced odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

  • The effect of HDL-C (OR, 0.863; 95% CI, 0.801-0.93) and ApoA-I (OR, 0.865; 95% CI, 0.806-0.929) remained significant when controlling for BMI.

  • Higher BMI was associated with increased odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.18), but when HDL was controlled for, this effect was no longer significant.

  • Hyperlipidaemia (OR, 1.362; 95% CI, 1.021-1.817), T2D (OR, 1.213; 95% CI, 1.028-1.432) and HbA1c (OR, 1.061; 95% CI, 1.005-1.121) were significantly associated with increased odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

  • However, when ApoA-I, HDL-C or BMI were controlled for, this effect was no longer significant.

  • Low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR, 0.995; 95% CI, 0.939-1.055), apolipoprotein B (OR, 1.003; 95% CI, 0.947-1.063), triglycerides (OR, 1.026; 95% CI, 0.969-1.087) and type 1 diabetes (OR, 0.817; 95% CI, 0.529-1.261) were not significantly associated with odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

Limitations

  • Sampling bias.

  • Risk of potential confounding.

  • Baseline cardiometabolic data were collected prior to the pandemic.

 

Scalsky RJ, Chen YJ, Desai K, O'Connell JR, Perry JA, Hong CC. Baseline cardiometabolic profiles and SARS-CoV-2 infection in the UK Biobank. PLoS One. 2021;16(4):e0248602. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0248602. PMID: 33793566.  View full text 

This clinical summary originally appeared on Univadis, part of the Medscape Professional Network.

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