Developing a Course to Promote Self-Care for Nurses to Address Burnout

Greg Couser, MD, MPH; Sherry Chesak, PhD, RN; Susanne Cutshall, DNP, APRN, CNS, APHN-BC, HWNC-BC

Disclosures

Online J Issues Nurs. 2020;25(3) 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

Nursing burnout is a common and costly organizational problem that affects both nurses and patient care. Health behaviors, such as healthy nutrition, and adequate sleep and exercise, have been cited as burnout reduction strategies. At Mayo Clinic, the authors developed an educational program for nurses and other healthcare team members to address burnout and consider strategies to navigate work and life stressors. Audience participation software measured the percentage of audience members meeting criteria for burnout, as well as confidence in their ability to manage three basic health-influencing behaviors that included eating, sleeping, and moving well. Findings revealed a high prevalence of nursing burnout and low confidence in achieving healthy nutrition, sleep, and exercise. In this article the authors review selected background information about self–care, describe the course design and implementation of an educational program, and discuss findings from a brief survey included in the program. Their discussion considers their findings in relation to select literature and identifies needs for further inquiry and project limitations. They conclude by encouraging the profession of nursing and nurses to continue efforts to support self-care through healthy behaviors throughout their careers.

Introduction

Burnout has become a topic of significance in healthcare, particularly in nursing (see Figure 1). The high demands placed on the inter-professional healthcare team have led to significant burnout amongst these team members (Bridgeman et al., 2018). Burnout has become increasingly prevalent (Shanafelt et al., 2015), and has been linked to medical errors and patient safety issues (Bridgeman et al., 2018; Hall et al., 2016). Specifically, nurses experiencing burnout often neglect the basic self-care behaviors of eating, sleeping, and moving well, which in turn compounds symptoms of burnout (Ross et al., 2017).

Figure 1.

Nursing Burnout Facts and Figures

In this article, we review selected background information about self–care, and describe the course design and implementation of an educational program developed and implemented at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. We will discuss our findings from a brief survey included in the program to inform our continued dedicated efforts to this important concern for nurses and all healthcare providers. Our discussion considers these findings in relation to select literature and identifies needs for further inquiry.

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE

processing....