Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults, 2018

Peter Boersma, MPH; Lindsey I. Black, MPH; Brian W. Ward, PhD

Disclosures

Prev Chronic Dis. 2020;17(9):e106 

In This Article

Results

In 2018, 51.8% (129 million) of civilian, noninstitutionalized adults had been diagnosed with at least 1 of 10 selected chronic conditions. More specifically, 24.6% (61 million) of adults had 1 chronic condition, and 27.2% (68 million) had ≥2 chronic conditions (Table).

Prevalence of multiple chronic conditions differed by population subgroups. Prevalence was higher among women (28.4%) than men (25.9%) and increased with advancing age. Prevalence of multiple chronic conditions was highest among non-Hispanic white adults (30.6%) and lowest among non-Hispanic Asian (16.4%) and Hispanic adults (17.7%). Among adults aged 18–64 years, the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions was higher among adults on public insurance (27.6%) than either adults on private insurance (15.7%) or uninsured adults (11.6%), and the prevalence differed significantly across all insurance subgroups. Among adults aged 65 or older, the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions was highest among adults with both Medicare and Medicaid ("Dual eligible") (76.9%), lowest among adults on Medicare only (excluding Medicare Advantage) (58.5%), and differed significantly across all insurance subgroups with the exception of those with private (63.2%) and Medicare Advantage coverage (63.0%). Examination by urbanicity indicated that those living in rural areas (34.8%) had a higher prevalence of multiple chronic conditions compared with those living in urban areas (26.1%).

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