Diazepam Premedication in Primary Augmentation Mammoplasty

Elizabeth A. Lucich, MD; Nicholas S. Adams, MD; Renee L. Barry, MD; Joshua J. Nelson, MD; Joshua P. Kelley, MD; John D. Renucci, MD

Disclosures

ePlasty. 2020;20(e2) 

In This Article

Results

A total of 189 patients were included. Ninety-three patients (49%) were included in the premedication group and 96 in the control group. There were no significant differences in demographic data collected (Table 1).

Within the intraoperative data, there were no statistically significant differences in implant size, number of concurrent procedures performed, or intraoperative opioid use (Table 2). There was a statistically significant decrease in operative times for patients receiving premedication. The operative time for patients receiving diazepam was 58.5 minutes; for those who did not receive diazepam, it was 64.5 minutes (P < .05).

Among immediate postoperative data collected, there were no statistically significant differences in immediate postoperative pain, nausea, emesis, antiemetic use, or time to discharge (Table 3). There was a statistically significant increase in postoperative opioid use in patients who received diazepam preoperatively (P < .05). Similarly, there was a statistically significant increase in the predischarge pain scores in those who received diazepam premedication (P < .05).

The data were further analyzed to determine whether there was a correlation between implant size and postoperative pain scores, opioid use, or time to discharge. There were no statistically significant differences identified (Table 4). There were statistically significant results in regard to patients' preoperative breast size, body mass index, intraoperative narcotics, total narcotics, and postoperative emesis (Table 5).

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