Cast Application Techniques for Common Pediatric Injuries

A Review

Karim Sabeh, MD; Amiethab Aiyer, MD; Spencer Summers, MD; William Hennrikus, MD

Disclosures

Curr Orthop Pract. 2020;31(3):277-287. 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

Casting has become a lost art. Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of fracture treatment in the pediatric population. The purpose of a cast is to immobilize and hold the fracture in proper alignment while minimizing the functional impairment of the limb. Basic understanding of multiple cast types is obligatory for practitioners with exposure to pediatric trauma. This article aims to update the readers and allow them to improve their cast application techniques for common pediatric fractures as well as cast removal skills, resulting in safe and satisfactory fracture outcomes with minimal complications.

Introduction

Fracture immobilization is the earliest method used to treat limb injuries. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks initially utilized wooden splints. Roman and Arabic writings later described methods used to stiffen splints and bandages using starch and albumin egg whites. In 1851 plaster of Paris was employed for treatment of fractures.[1,2] The purpose of a cast is to immobilize and hold the fracture in proper alignment while minimizing the functional impairment of the limb. The cast also supports the soft tissues to help reduce pain and swelling.[1–3]

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE

processing....