Topical Povidone Iodine Inhibits Bacterial Growth in the Oral Cavity of Patients on Mechanical Ventilation

A Randomized Controlled Study

Shoma Tsuda; Sakiko Soutome; Saki Hayashida; Madoka Funahara; Souichi Yanamoto; Masahiro Umeda

Disclosures

BMC Oral Health. 2020;20(62) 

In This Article

Results

Patient Characteristics

The patient characteristics were shown in Table 2.

Total Bacterial Count in the Oral Cavity of the Intervention and Control Groups

Figure 3 shows the changes in the total bacterial count before and after oral care in the intervention and control groups. After irrigation of the oral cavity, the number of bacteria decreased, but increased again at 1 h after oral care in the control group; however, in the intervention group, bacterial growth was inhibited up to 3 h after oral care. The number of bacteria in the oral cavity was significantly different between the intervention and control groups at 1, 2, and 3 h after oral care.

Figure 3.

Changes in the total bacterial count before and after oral care in the intervention and control groups. There was no significant difference in the total bacterial count between the 2 groups before and after oral care, but at 1, 2, and 3 h after application of iodine povidone, it in the intervention group was significantly lower than that in the control group

Changes in the Balance of the Oral Microbiota in the Intervention Group

The number of streptococci, MRSA, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, P. gingivalis, and C. albicans was decreased at 1–3 h after oral care in the intervention group (Figure 4). These findings suggest that povidone iodine inhibited the growth of all microorganisms tested and did not disturb the balance of the oral microbiota.

Figure 4.

Changes in the count of each microorganism before and after oral care in the intervention and control groups. Each microorganism decreased at 1–3 h after application of povidone iodine, suggesting that this disinfectant does not disturb the oral microbiota or promote the growth of bacteria resistant to antibiotics (e.g., MRSA) or fungi

processing....