Coupled Blue and Red Light-emitting Diodes Therapy Efficacy in Patients With Rosacea

Two Case Reports

Elisabetta Sorbellini; Maria Pia De Padova; Fabio Rinaldi

Disclosures

J Med Case Reports. 2020;14(22) 

In This Article

Case Presentations

Case Report 1

A 22-year-old Caucasian woman presented to a dermatological clinic with a 5-year history of pink eruptions on her nose. She also reported a burning sensation. She was diagnosed as having papulopustular rosacea subtype, moderate grade, according to the classification and staging of rosacea developed by the NRS Expert Committee.[5] In the previous 2 years she was treated with two cycles of orally administered tetracycline (Lymecycline), 300 mg per day, for 12 weeks. Systemic therapy was associated with metronidazole cream 1% for cycles of 6 months. In the last 6 months before the visit, she also submitted to 40% pyruvic acid peeling every 25 days, with poor response and continuous relapses. A combined and sequential plan of blue (480 nm ± 15 nm, 300 J/minute) and red (650 ± 15 nm, 100 J/minute) LED therapy regimen was planned twice a week for a total of ten sessions. A quasi-monochromatic 120 LED system (Dermodinamica® instrument, ELISOR Srl, Milan, Italy) was used for 15 minutes (each wavelength).

Case Report 2

A 68-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 7-year history of papulopustular rosacea, moderate grade,[5] which extended over the entire surface of his face. He had experienced extended relapses on his face once a year in the past 6–7 years. He was previously treated with two cycles of Lymecycline (tetracycline) at 300 mg per day or azithromycin every 2 weeks in combination with 0.75% topical metronidazole. He was submitted to LED therapy twice a week for a total of ten sessions. Blue (480 nm ± 15 nm, 300 J/minute) and red (650 ± 15 nm, 300 J/minute) were sequentially irradiated for 15 minutes by means of LED system Dermodinamica® (ELISOR Srl, Milan, Italy). The therapy was coupled with topical 15% azelaic acid.

Outcome and Follow-up

Erythema, burning sensation, and itching were assessed using a visual scale grading (0 = no symptoms, 4 = very severe). Erythema and papules were subjectively assessed by the dermatologist, whereas the intensity of itch and burning sensations was expressed by our patients. A good response was obtained for both patients after ten treatments with LEDs. Both patients reported a reduction of symptoms such as burning and itching. Also, a reduction of erythema and papules was observed after five sessions of LED therapy (Figures 1b and 2b). Further improvement was observed at the end of treatment: ten sessions of LED therapy (Figures 1c and 2c).

Figure 1.

Papulopustular rosacea on the nose of case report 1 at the base time (a), after five sessions (b), and after ten sessions (c) with coupled blue (480 nm) and red (650 nm) light-emitting diodes therapy

Figure 2.

Papulopustular rosacea with erythema and telangiectasias on the glabella, forehead, nose, cheeks, and chin of case report 2 at the base time (a), after five sessions (b), and after ten sessions (c) with coupled blue (480 nm) and red (650 nm) light-emitting diodes therapy

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