Management of Acute Compartment Syndrome

Col. Patrick M. Osborn, MD; Andrew H. Schmidt, MD

Disclosures

J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2020;28(3):e108-e114. 

In This Article

Recommendations

The AAOS/Major Extremity Trauma and Rehabilitation Consortium Management of Acute Compartment Syndrome Clinical Practice Guideline are evidence-based recommendations summarized in Table 1, Table 2, Table 3, Table 4 and Table 5. Discussions of how each recommendation was developed and the complete evidence report are contained in the full guideline at www.aaos.org/acsguideline (Figure 1). Readers are urged to consult the full guideline for the comprehensive evaluation of the available scientific studies. The recommendations were established using methods of evidence-based medicine that rigorously control for bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility.

The Summary of Recommendations is not intended to stand alone. Medical care should be based on evidence, a physician's expert judgment, and the patient's circumstances, values, preferences, and rights. For treatment procedures to provide benefit, mutual collaboration with shared decision making between the patient and physician/allied healthcare provider is essential.

A strong recommendation means that the quality of the supporting evidence is high. A moderate recommendation means that the benefits exceed the potential harm (or that the potential harm clearly exceeds the benefits in the case of a negative recommendation), but the quality/applicability of the supporting evidence is not as strong. A limited recommendation means that there is a lack of compelling evidence that has resulted in an unclear balance between benefits and potential harm. A consensus recommendation means that expert opinion supports the guideline recommendation, although there is no available empirical evidence that meets the inclusion criteria of the guideline's systematic review.

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE

processing....