Assessing Indoor Environmental Control Practices by Race/Ethnicity Among Children With Asthma in 14 US States and Puerto Rico, 2013–2014

Faye M. Rozwadowski, MD; Ginger L. Chew, ScD; Hatice S. Zahran, MD, MPH; Melissa L. Santorelli, PhD, MPH

Disclosures

Prev Chronic Dis. 2019;16(12):E166 

In This Article

Results

Children aged 5–14 years were the largest represented age groups from which data were drawn for the 14 states and Puerto Rico (Table 1). Almost 30% of children from the 14 states were from a household with an annual income <$25,000; 49% had a parent or legal guardian without a college degree; and approximately half were of a racial/ethnic minority. Sixty-one percent of the children in Puerto Rico were from a household with an annual income <$25,000, and more than half had a parent or legal guardian without a college degree.

Across all races/ethnicities, at least 80% of respondents reported no smoking in the home, and 58% or more reported no pets in the bedroom (Table 2). The unadjusted analysis showed that use of a kitchen exhaust fan, use of a bathroom exhaust fan, avoiding pets in the bedroom, and washing linens in hot water varied by race/ethnicity (P < .01 for all).

The adjusted odds of using an air purifier, using a dehumidifier, and avoiding pets in the bedroom were higher for non-Hispanic black children than for non-Hispanic white children in the 14 states. For example, odds of restricting pets from the bedroom were approximately 4 times higher (aOR = 4.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.26–8.75) for non-Hispanic black children than for non-Hispanic white children after adjusting for age, household income, and parental education level (Table 3). Households with Hispanic children had higher odds of using a kitchen exhaust fan (aOR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.02–3.13) and washing linens in hot water (aOR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06–3.09), compared with non-Hispanic white children in the 14 states.

The adjusted odds of using a kitchen exhaust fan (aOR = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.11–0.42) and odds of using a bathroom exhaust fan (aOR = 0.14; 95% CI, 0.07–0.31) were lower for children in Puerto Rico than for children in the 14 states. In contrast, the odds of using a dust mite–impermeable pillow cover (aOR = 3.59; 95% CI, 1.82–7.09) or mattress encasement (aOR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.23–4.83) were highest among Puerto Rican children who are island residents. Although not significant, avoiding pets in the bedroom (aOR = 1.44; 95% CI, 0.68–3.04) was higher for children in Puerto Rico than for children in the 14 states.

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