Trends in Repeat Births and Use of Postpartum Contraception Among Teens — United States, 2004–2015

Deborah L. Dee, PhD; Karen Pazol, PhD; Shanna Cox, MSPH; Ruben A. Smith, PhD; Katherine Bower, PhD; Martha Kapaya, MPH; Amy Fasula, PhD; Ayanna Harrison; Charlan D. Kroelinger, PhD; Denise D'Angelo, MPH; Leslie Harrison, MPH; Emilia H. Koumans, MD; Nikki Mayes; Wanda D. Barfield, MD; Lee Warner, PhD

Disclosures

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2017;66(16):422-426. 

In This Article

Repeat Teen Births: 2015 and Change From 2004 to 2015

In 2015, among 413,144 births to teens aged 15–19 years, 38,324 (16.7%) were repeat births (Supplementary Table 1; https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/). The prevalence of teen births that were repeat births was highest among Hispanics (18.7%), followed by non-Hispanic black (black) (17.9%), and non-Hispanic white (white) (14.3%) births. The proportion of teen births that were repeat births varied by state, from 10.6% in Vermont to 21.4% in the District of Columbia.

Overall, the number of repeat teen births declined 53.8%, from 82,997 in 2004 to 38,324 in 2015. In addition, the percentage of teen births that were repeat births decreased 16.9%, from 20.1% in 2004 to 16.7% in 2015. By race/ethnicity, the largest declines in the percentage of teen births that were repeat births occurred among blacks (21.8%), followed by Hispanics (16.8%), and whites (13.9%). By age, declines in the percentage of teen births that were repeat births occurred both among teens aged 15–17 years (23.8%) and 18–19 years (19.7%). From 2004 to 2015, 35 states experienced a significant decline in the percentage of teen births that were repeat births; of the 35 states, 12 experienced declines of >20%, and none experienced a significant increase (Figure 1).

Figure 1.

Percent change in repeat teen births* —United States, 2004–2015
*Repeat teen births are two or more live births to a mother aged <20 years (Vital Statistics).
Data for 2004 and 2015 downloaded from CDC WONDER (https://wonder.cdc.gov).

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