DSM-5 Update in Psychodermatology

Dominik Alex Nowak, HBSc, MD; Se Mang Wong, MD, FRCPC

Disclosures

Skin Therapy Letter. 2016;21(3) 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

Up to a third of dermatology outpatients have a significant psychiatric issue complicating their skin complaint. Although the ideal would frequently involve psychiatric assessment, those with comorbid mental illness often refuse psychiatric referral. As a result, it is imperative that dermatologists be mindful of psychiatric comorbidity in their patients and comfortable with the fundamentals of psychodermatologic diagnosis and therapy. This update summarizes current concepts, relevance, and therapeutics in psychodermatology, including aspects pertinent to depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, impulse-control, and delusional disorders as described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5, published in 2013 by the American Psychiatric Association).

Introduction

Mind and skin are intimately related. Up to a third of dermatology outpatients have a significant psychiatric issue complicating their skin complaint.[1] The dermatologist's work is far from skin deep; often the most meaningful aspects of management involve success in resolving the psychosocial impact of cutaneous disease. Although the ideal management would frequently involve psychiatric assessment, those with comorbid mental illness often refuse psychiatric referral. As a result, it is imperative that dermatologists be mindful of psychiatric comorbidity in their patients and comfortable with the fundamentals of psychodermatologic diagnosis and therapy.

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE

processing....