Receipt of Evidence-based Brief Cessation Interventions by Health Professionals and use of Cessation Assisted Treatments Among Current Adult Cigarette-only Smokers: National Adult Tobacco Survey, 2009–2010

Judy Kruger; Alissa O'Halloran; Abby C. Rosenthal; Stephen D. Babb; Michael C. Fiore

Disclosures

BMC Public Health. 2016;16(141) 

In This Article

Results

Sample Characteristics

Table 1 presents weighted data on demographic characteristics of the overall sample of current cigarette-only smokers (n = 10,801). Among adult current cigarette-only smokers, most were between 35 and 54 years of age (44.8 %), non-Hispanic white (74.0 %), and had a high school diploma (34.8 %).

Receipt of Brief Cessation Interventions

Among current cigarette-only smokers who had seen a health professional in the last 12 months, 88.3 % were 'Asked' about current tobacco use, 66.4 % were 'Advised' to quit, 43.4 % were 'Assessed' for their willingness to quit, 38.6 % were 'Assisted', and 6.3 % reported that their health professional 'Arranged' a follow-up (Table 2). Rates of receipt of 'Assisted' interventions from a health professional were: cessation medication (24.9 %); cessation materials (booklets, videos, or website addresses) (24.4 %); referral to counseling (a telephone quitline, a class or program, or one-on-one counseling) (17.8 %); referral to counseling and prescribing medication (11.2 %); and helping patients set a date to quit (5.6 %).

Cessation Treatment use

Among current cigarette-only smokers, 19.6 % reported using medication, 6.3 % reported use of a combination of counseling and medication, 3.8 % reported using a class or program, 3.7 % reported using one-on-one counseling, and 2.6 % reported calling a telephone quitline (Fig. 2).

Figure 2.

Use of tobacco cessation treatments by current cigarette-only smokers—NATS, 2009–2010

Receipt of the 5 A's Intervention and use of Cessation Assisted Treatment

Among respondents who received all 5 A's, 31.7 % reported using counseling compared with only 3.8 % who received one or none of the 5 A's (Table 3). Logistic regression analyses indicated that respondents who received all 5 A's had higher odds of using counseling services (OR: 11.2, 95 % CI: 7.1–17.5) compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Respondents who received any four (OR: 2.4, 95 % CI: 1.6–3.5) or any three (OR: 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.2–2.9) of the 5 A's had higher odds of using counseling services compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Among current cigarette-only smokers, odds of using counseling services were higher among respondents aged 35–54 years (OR: 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.6–5.3) and those aged ≥55 years (OR: 2.6, 95 % CI: 1.4–4.8) than those aged 18–24 years.

Among respondents who received all 5 A's, 46.8 % reported using cessation medication, compared with only 12.4 % who received one or none of the 5 A's. Logistic regression analyses indicated that respondents who received all 5 A's had higher odds of using cessation medication (OR: 6.2, 95 % CI: 4.3–9.0) compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Respondents who received any four (OR: 2.2, 95 % CI: 1.7–2.8) or any three (OR: 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.3–2.5) of the 5 A's had an increased odds of using cessation medications compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Odds of using medication to try to quit were higher among respondents aged 35–54 years (OR: 2.1, 95 % CI: 1.4–3.3) and those aged ≥55 years (OR: 1.6, 95 % CI: 1.0–2.5) than those aged 18–24 years. Odds of using medication were higher among respondents with some college education (OR: 1.6, 95 % CI: 1.1–2.2) than those without a high school degree.

Among respondents who received all 5 A's, 29.0 % reported using a combination of counseling and medication compared with only 2.6 % who received one or none of the 5 A's. Logistic regression analyses indicated that respondents who received all 5 A's had higher odds of using a combination of counseling and medication (OR: 14.6, 95 % CI: 9.3–23.0) compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Respondents who received any four (OR: 2.9, 95 % CI: 2.0–4.4) or any three (OR: 2.0, 95 % CI: 1.3–3.3) of the 5 A's had higher odds of using a combination of counseling and medication compared to those who received one or none of the 5 A's. Odds of using a combination of counseling and medication to try to quit were higher among respondents aged 35–54 years (OR: 4.0, 95 % CI: 1.9–8.4) and those aged ≥55 years (OR: 3.5, 95 % CI: 1.7–7.6), than those 18–24 years of age.

Among respondents who received each sub-set of the 5A's, the proportion who received any one or none of the 5A's was 33.6 %, any two was 18.3 %, any three was 13.9 %, any four was 28.1 %, or all five was 6.1 % (data not shown).

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE

processing....