Advances in the Treatment of Testicular Cancer

Yaron Ehrlich; David Margel; Marc Alan Lubin; Jack Baniel

Disclosures

Transl Androl Urol. 2015;4(3):381-390. 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

Germ cell tumors (GCT) are relatively uncommon, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States. It has become an important oncological disease for several reasons. It is the most common malignancy in young men 15–35 years old. GCTs are among a unique numbers of neoplasms where biochemical markers play a critical role. Finally, it is a model of curable cancer. In this review we discuss cancer epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic principles. Recent advances in the management of stage I GCT and controversies in the management of post chemotherapy residual mass are presented.

Introduction

Despite their infrequency, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States, germ cell tumors (GCTs) have become an important oncological disease for several reasons. GCT is the most common malignancy in young men, 15–35 years old, and thus, has the potential to greatly shorten a man's productive years. Second, GCT is amongst a unique group of neoplasms in whom biochemical markers play a critical role. In GCT's serum tumor markers are an integral part of patient management as part of diagnosis, staging, risk assessment, evaluation of response to therapy and detection of relapse. Finally, GCT is a model of curable cancer, and a triumph of modern oncology. Current chemotherapy protocols and surgery yield cure rates exceeding 95%.[1]

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