Does Post-bleaching Fluoridation Affect the Further Demineralization of Bleached Enamel? An In Vitro Study

Hande Kemaloğlu; Hüseyin Tezel; Zeynep Ergücü

Disclosures

BMC Oral Health. 2014;14(113) 

In This Article

Results

The Ca2+ concentrations of the samples were measured at the end of the 4th, 8th, 12th, and 16th days (Table 2, Figure 1). The loss of Ca2+ in the control, 38% HP, 38% HP + NaF, and 38% HP + TiF4 groups were evaluated cumulatively every 4 days, and at the end of the 16th day, 15.07 ± 1.81 μg/mL, 22.44 ± 2.52 μg/mL, 13.67 ± 1.86 μg/mL, and 9.12 ± 2.40 μg/mL were obtained in total, respectively (Figure 2).

Figure 1.

The calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations of the specimens measured at the end of the 4th, 8th, 12th, and 16th days (μg/mL).

Figure 2.

The total calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations of the specimens measured at the end of the 16th day (mg/ml).

The loss of Ca2+ in each of the test groups was compared with that of the control group using the Friedman test. A statistically significant difference was observed among the groups after 4, 8, 12 and 16 days and in total (p < 0.05). The Wilcoxon test was used to identify possible statistically significant differences between the groups.

After the demineralization process, there was significantly less Ca2+ released in the bleached/fluoride-treated groups (38% HP + NaF and 38% HP + TiF4) than in the bleached-only group (38% HP) and control group. When the NaF and TiF4-treated samples were compared, there were no significant differences between the amounts of Ca2+ released from the specimens after the 4th, 8th, and 16th days (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the test period, the total amount of Ca2+ in the buffer solution was significantly less for the TiF4-treated samples than for the NaF-treated samples (p < 0.05) (Table 2 and Table 3). Thus, it might be suggested that TiF4-treated samples were more acid-resistant than NaF-treated samples.

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