COMMENTARY

The 'A' Word: Are Doctors Arrogant?

Leslie Kane

Disclosures

June 17, 2014

In This Article

Is There an Outbreak of Rudeness?

Barry Silverman, MD, a cardiologist and coauthor with pediatrician Saul Adler, MD, of Your Doctors' Manners Matter: Better Health Through Civility in the Doctor's Office and in the Hospital, says, "While most doctors are appreciated and respected by their patients, there's a general perception that professionalism has declined.

"Patients are often more informed, ask detailed questions, and demand a high level of service, while demands on the doctor's time increase and reimbursements fall," says Dr. Silverman. "What patients interpret as arrogance is many times a rushed and harried doctor, not an uncaring one. Medicine can be mentally and physically exhausting, but the bottom line is that the doctor must listen and communicate with the patient to deliver quality medical care."

Still, remaining pleasant and calm is easier for some doctors than for others. There's no uniform physician personality; many doctors have a natural "people person" inclination, while others are more stoic.

Are doctors expected to smile and be nice in every circumstance, no matter what?

"Professionalism is not about putting on a happy face or being someone you are not; it is about providing quality care for the patient," says Dr. Adler. "Patients are more informed and have access to more information than ever before. Much of that information is incorrect and sometimes harmful. That means that part of the professional duty is to teach as well as treat.

"Patients understand that doctors have significant restraints on their time, and it is not unreasonable for doctors to use preprinted written materials, educational resources outside the doctor's personal office, and honest and informative Websites," says Dr. Adler. "However, under no circumstances should the doctor be rude or abrupt; a smile and kind, considerate behavior is always appropriate."

It would be naive to say that there aren't arrogant doctors. But there are far more doctors trying to do their best for patients and relate to them.

Comments

3090D553-9492-4563-8681-AD288FA52ACE
Comments on Medscape are moderated and should be professional in tone and on topic. You must declare any conflicts of interest related to your comments and responses. Please see our Commenting Guide for further information. We reserve the right to remove posts at our sole discretion.
Post as:

processing....