You're Not on the 'Best Doctors' List -- Does It Matter?

Shelly Reese

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May 28, 2014

In This Article

Is It a Blow to Your Ego?

Whether the lists have value for physicians beyond bragging rights is open to debate. Hospitals and health systems are quick to issue press releases touting their "top" doctors. Some physicians practicing in competitive markets say making a list can be a huge career booster, attracting new patients and media attention. Others who already have busy practices say they don't need to have their name on a list to attract patients.

"There are good arguments on both sides," says Kanaan. "From a marketing perspective, a doctor's reputation is all that he or she has. They can provide amazing care, but if they don't have the reputation, patients aren't going to walk through their door."

When physicians ask her opinion about whether they should purchase an advertisement in the magazine or a plaque for the waiting room, Kanaan says it's important to consider their individual circumstances. Do they need help with reputation management? Have patients been slamming them in online reviews? How credible is the list in question and how much do they intend to spend?

"These things can get expensive, and sometimes doctors don't realize how expensive they are," she says. "The biggest cost is usually advertising in the magazine, but in some cases, participating is buying into a PR opportunity that entitles you to use the ranking organization's logo on print and marketing materials."

Too often, she says, physicians participate not because they want to but because they feel obliged to do so. They participate because the competitor down the street is a "best" doctor or because their partner has a plaque hanging in the waiting room and they don't want patients to perceive them as inferior. Likewise, if they buy a plaque one year, they feel compelled to do so the next, lest patients think they didn't make the list a second or third or fourth time.

"For many doctors, it becomes one of their yearly marketing expenses," Kanaan says. "They realize that if they don't do it, then there could be repercussions." In that regard, she says, the lists "somewhat have doctors on their knees: If they don't participate, they're going to send the wrong message."

Specialists, particularly those in highly competitive fields or whose services aren't covered by insurance, seem to feel the greatest pressure, she says. While patients often choose primary care physicians based on convenient locations, they are willing to travel much further to find a specialist, making it more important for specialists to differentiate themselves.

"I see the value of these as a marketing tool," Kanaan says. "But this is just one very, very small part of what it takes to market a practice, and it's not even a necessary part. If I had a limited marketing budget, this would not be my first priority. Not by a long shot."

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