Primary Epiploic Appendagitis

Katherine N. Montgomery, MD; Michael C. Doherty, MD

Disclosures

Appl Radiol. 2013;42(2):17-18. 

In This Article

Case Summery

Case 1: A 41-year-old man presented with sharp pain localized to the left upper quadrant for 1 day. The pain was exacerbated by movement and lifting. The patient complained of mild anorexia, but denied nausea, vomiting, change in bowel habits, melena, or weight loss. On physical exam he was moderately tender to palpation in the left upper quadrant. His white blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were normal. The patient was discharged after being scheduled for an outpatient computer tomography (CT) scan.

He returned 2 days later with persistent pain. Physical exam again revealed moderate tenderness to palpation in the left upper abdomen. The patient was given an analgesic and a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed.

Case 2: A 40-year-old woman presented with constant right lower quadrant abdominal pain of 4 days' duration. The pain was associated with nausea and exacerbated by coughing and movement. She denied fever, vomiting, or change in bowel habits. On physical exam she was moderately tender to palpation in the right lower quadrant. Her WBC was 10,100. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed.

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