Teaching Interventions in Contact Dermatitis

Florian Seyfarth; Sibylle Schliemann; Dimitar Antonov; Peter Elsner

Disclosures

Dermatitis. 2011;22(1):8-15. 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

Prevention of occupational contact dermatitis is of utmost significance for both insurers and legislators because it can preserve the individual's ability to work and result in decreased costs for public health. In the last 20 years, many concepts for educational interventions and a multitude of teaching aids have been developed by insurance associations and public institutions from different countries (eg, the United States, Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland, and Germany). For didactic purposes, terms of different levels of prevention have been inaugurated in northern Europe in the context of occupational dermatology. This review presents different educational interventions in the fields of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention as well as evaluation studies of these measures, especially among health care workers, hairdressers, metalworkers, and bakers' apprentices. Special emphasis is put on the prevention of allergic contact dermatitis.

Introduction

In 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) published the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, which proposed educational interventions (among other concepts) for improving the health of the world's population. This concept proved to be popular in various medical disciplines. Teaching interventions in the field of dermatology were also improved, especially those related to the prevention of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Prevention of occupational contact dermatitis is of utmost significance for both insurers and legislators because it can preserve the individual's ability to work and result in decreased costs for public health. More than 20 years after the Ottawa charter's publication, many concepts for educational interventions and a multitude of teaching aids have been developed by insurance associations and public institutions from different countries. Differences in national approaches and legislation make it difficult to maintain a general overview on this topic. This review attempts to offer some orientation in a jungle of different concepts. By presenting examples of teaching interventions derived from the United States, Scandinavia, Switzerland, and Germany, different national efforts in the prevention of occupational contact dermatitis are reviewed in this article to stimulate knowledge and application of existing tools and the development of further concepts.

Comments

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