Vitamin D Supplementation and Type 2 Diabetes: A Substudy of a Randomised Placebo-controlled Trial in Older People (RECORD Trial, ISRCTN 51647438)

Alison Avenell; Jonathan A. Cook; Graeme S. MacLennan; Gladys C. McPherson

Disclosures

Age Ageing. 2009;38(5):606-609. 

In This Article

Results

Participants' baseline characteristics are given in Table 1. The mean age of participants was 77 years, 85% were females and 94% could walk out of doors unaccompanied. Their mean weight was 65 kg, 99% of participants were white, 8% reported already having diabetes, and the dietary calcium intake was < 700 mg/day in 39%.

A total of 2.5% (60/2416) of respondents randomised to vitamin D3 reported becoming diabetic compared with 2.2% (54/2413) on placebo (adjusted odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.77–1.62, P = 0.57) (see Table 2). In the secondary, per protocol analysis, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.68 (95% CI 0.40–1.16, P = 0.16).

A total of 1.5% (37/2447) of respondents randomised to vitamin D3 started using tablets or injections to control diabetes compared with 1.6% (38/2447) randomised to placebo (adjusted odds ratio 0.97) (95% CI 0.62–1.54, P = 0.91). In the corresponding, per protocol analysis, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.78 (95% CI 0.41–1.50, P = 0.46).

Our two post hoc analyses of developing diabetes, or initiation of tablets or injections also showed no evidence of an interaction effect between vitamin D and calcium (adjusted odds ratio 0.85, 95% CI 0.29–2.53, P = 0.77and adjusted odds ratio 2.00, 95% CI 0.53 to 7.57, P = 0.31, respectively).

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