Duplex Scan in Patients With Clinical Suspicion of Deep Venous Thrombosis

Aguinaldo de Oliveira; Graciliano J. França; Enrique A. Vidal; Paulo S.D.B. Stalke; Liz A.V. Baroncini

Disclosures

Cardiovasc Ultrasound 

In This Article

Results

Clinical parameters indicating duplex scan are displayed on Table 1 . According to symptoms, 101 (42.3%) were related to right lower limb; 113 (47.3%) to left lower limb; and 25 were related to both lower limbs. Forty-eight patients presented a normal duplex scan. Venous thrombosis was found in 117 patients (0.49; CI 0.43-0.55): 75 with DVT, 20 with both superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) and DVT, and 22 with SVT alone. Other pathologies were found in 74 patients. Among other pathologies, old thrombosis was most frequent (23 cases; 31%), followed by edema (18 cases; 24.4%) ( Table 2 & Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). Among patients with DVT the most involved veins were below the knee, followed up by popliteal vein, superficial femoral vein and common femoral vein. Among patients with SVT, in 20 (47.6%) there was progression to the deep venous system: in 9 (45%) by perforans veins; in 6 by saphenous-femoral junction (30%); and in 5 (25%) by saphenous-popliteal junction. We did not perform contrast venography after duplex scan. The decision about medical treatment and follow-up of each patient was made by the referring physician according to individual needs. But in our setting physicians generally request only the duplex scan without complementation for clinical suspicion of DVT and the management of patients is performed in accordance with the results of the duplex scan. Therefore, it was not possible to calculate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this method in the present study.

Extrinsic compression of iliac vein by arterial aneurism.

Baker's cyst.

Thrombosis of common femoral vein.

Superficial venous thrombosis.

Distal femoral superficial vein with partial thrombus in vein lumen.

Thrombosis of perforan vein.

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