COMMENTARY

Skin-to-Skin Contact Provides Analgesia to Neonates

 


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This is the Medscape Medical Minute. I'm Dr. George Lundberg.

Neonates experience pain. Interventions may be pharmacologic or non - pharmacologic. Three investigators in Brazil report in the journal Pain in 2008[1] on a randomized, controlled, single-blind trial of 95 preterm neonates of postmenstrual age of 28 to 36 weeks. The painful event was lancing of the heel. Pain measurement was by heart rate change, oxygen saturation, and observed facial activity. Group 1 received no anesthesia; group 2 was held skin-to-skin for 10 minutes before and during the lancing; group 3 was given oral glucose 2 minutes prior to lancing. Group 2, the skin-to-skin group, demonstrated significantly less objective evidence of pain than either group 1 or 3. Conclusion: skin-to-skin contact exerts an analgesic effect in neonates.

This article is selected from Medscape Best Evidence.[2] I'm Dr. George Lundberg.

 


 

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