Surgical Audit of Inadvertent Parathyroidectomy During Total Thyroidectomy: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcome

J. Rajinikanth, MS, DNB, MRCS; M.J. Paul, MS; Deepak T. Abraham, MS; C.K. Ben Selvan, MS; Aravindan Nair, MS

Disclosures

Medscape J Med. 2009;11(1):29 

In This Article

Introduction

In experienced hands, thyroidectomy is associated with a morbidity as low as 2%[1] if parathyroid glands and laryngeal nerves are identified and preserved. Awareness of the anatomic relationship of parathyroid gland to the thyroids is important in preventing postoperative hypocalcemia. In the literature, the incidence of temporary hypocalcemia after thyroid surgery ranges from 1.6% to 50%, and permanent hypocalcemia occurs after 1.5% to 4% of surgeries.[2,3,4,5,6] The etiology includes surgical trauma, devascularization, and inadvertent parathyroid excision (IPE). The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for IPE during total thyroidectomy, the incidence of intracapsular parathyroid glands, and the serum calcium levels and hospital stay of patients with IPE.

 


 

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