SEN Virus Infection in Egyptian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C and Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

Maisa Omar, PhD; Samah Saad El-Din, PhD; Nevine Fam, MD; Manal Diab, MD; Mohamed Shemis, PhD; Manar Raafat, MD; Moataz Seyam, MD; Moataz Hssan, MD; Afkar Badawy, PhD; Maha Akl, PhD; Mohamed Saber, PhD

Disclosures

Medscape J Med. 2008;10(12):290 

In This Article

Results

Table 1 shows the prevalence of SEN virus DNA among the 3 study groups. SEN virus-D/H DNA was detected in 13.5% of patients with chronic liver disease, 11.1% of patients undergoing hemodialysis, and 7.1% of healthy controls, with no significant differences between patients and the control group. SEN virus-D genotype was detected in 10 (59%) of 17 SEN virus-positive cases, and SEN virus-H genotype was detected in 7 (41%) cases. Distribution of SEN virus-D and SEN virus-H did not significantly differ between patients and the control group. Figure 1 shows the PCR findings for SEN virus genotype H.

Figure 1.

Agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 230-base pair fragment of SEN virus-H (M = molecular size marker [Amplisize; Bio-Rad, Hercules, California], lanes 1 and 3 = positive samples, lane 2 = negative sample, lane 4 = positive control, and lane 5 = negative control.)

On the basis of clinical, ultrasonographic, and histopathologic findings, 39 (52.7%) of patients with chronic liver disease were given a diagnosis of chronic hepatitis; 35 (47.3%) were cirrhotic. Serotyping for HCV was done on 29 serum samples from patients with chronic liver disease. Serotype 4 was detected in 20 (69%) samples, and other serotypes (1, 3, and mixed) were detected in 9 (31%) samples. Although SEN virus coinfection was more associated with HCV serotype 4, no statistically significant differences were found in the distribution of different serotypes among SEN virus-infected and noninfected patients. Demographic, virologic, and clinical data of the patients with chronic liver disease were compared according to the status of SEN virus infection. Mean age, sex distribution, mean serum ALT levels, and virologic and clinical features did not significantly differ between SEN virus-infected and noninfected patients ( Table 2 ).

A subgroup analysis of 74 patients with chronic liver disease showed that 15 of these patients had hepatocellular carcinoma and 59 did not. The rate of SEN virus positivity was significantly higher in patients with chronic liver disease patients and hepatocellular carcinoma (33.3%) than in those with chronic liver disease only (8.5%) (P < .05) (Figure 2). However, no significant differences were noted between SEN virus-infected and noninfected patients ( Table 3 ).

Figure 2.

Prevalence of SEN V infection among patients with chronic liver disease who did and did not have hepatocellular carcinoma. HCC = hepatocellular carcinoma. P < .05.

Coinfection with SEN virus was detected in 1 of 11 patients with chronic HCV infection before they received alpha-interferon/ribavirin combination therapy. Clearance of both HCV RNA and SEN virus DNA was observed 12 weeks after the patients had received the treatment.

Table 4 compares the clinical and virologic characteristics of patients undergoing hemodialysis who did and did not have SEN virus infection. Duration of hemodialysis and history of blood transfusion did not significantly differ between infected and noninfected patients. Coinfection with HCV and hepatitis B virus was observed among 80% and 20%, respectively, of SEN virus-infected patients undergoing hemodialysis.

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