Darrell Hulisz, RPh, PharmD; Melissa Lagzdins, RPh, PharmD

Disclosures

US Pharmacist. 2008;33(9):HS11-HS20. 

In This Article

Introduction

Pharmacists often receive inquiries about the effects of medications on blood pressure. For example, concerns about OTC cough and cold products still arise even though some ingredients, such as phenylpropanolamine, have been removed from the U.S. market. While only a few classes of drugs cause clinically significant increases in arterial pressure, pharmacists should be aware of drugs that may interfere with effective blood pressure control. A review of drug-drug interactions with antihypertensive agents is beyond the scope of this article. However, some of the more common examples of druginduced hypertension will be discussed ( Table 1 ). Drug-induced blood pressure elevations represent an important and modifiable cause of secondary hypertension; therefore, it is imperative that pharmacists recognize this causal relationship.

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