William L. Hasler, MD

Disclosures

Medscape J Med. 2008;10(1):16 

In This Article

Introduction

Gastroparesis presents with symptoms of gastric retention and nongastrointestinal manifestations, with objective evidence of delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Diabetic, idiopathic, and postsurgical gastroparesis are the most common forms, although many other conditions are associated with symptomatic delayed gastric emptying ( Table 1 ). Gastroparesis is estimated to affect up to 4% of the US population[1] and may produce either mild, intermittent symptoms of nausea, early satiety, and postprandial fullness with little impairment of daily function, or relentless vomiting with total disability and frequent hospitalizations. A recent report estimated that inpatient costs for patients with severe gastroparesis approach $7000/month.[2]


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