Popular Sweetener Sucralose as a Migraine Trigger

Rajendrakumar M. Patel, MD; Rakesh Sarma, MD; Edwin Grimsley, MD

Disclosures

Headache. 2006;46(8):1303-1304. 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Sucralose (trichlorogalactosucrose, or better known as Splenda) is an artificial sweetener from native sucrose that was approved by the FDA on April 1, 1998 (April Fool's Day). This observation of a potential causal relationship between sucralose and migraines may be important for physicians to remember this can be a possible trigger during dietary history taking. Identifying further triggers for migraine headaches, in this case sucralose, may help alleviate some of the cost burden (through expensive medical therapy or missed work opportunity) as well as provide relief to migraineurs.

Millions of Americans utilize artificial sweeteners as a means of dietary control of sugar intake. Sucralose (trichlorogalactosucrose, or better known as Splenda) is an artificial sweetener from native sucrose that was approved by the FDA on April 1, 1998.[1]

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