Device-Guided Breathing to Lower Blood Pressure: Case Report and Clinical Overview

William J. Elliott, MD, PhD; Joseph L. Izzo, Jr, MD

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In This Article

Device Description

The device (RESPeRATE, www.resperate.com/MD) consists of a control box containing a microprocessor, a belt-type respiration sensor, and headphones, which provide feedback to the patient (Figure 3). During a session of device-guided breathing, the device analyzes the breathing rate and pattern and creates a personalized melody composed of 2 distinct tones -- one tone for inhalation and one for exhalation. As the patient synchronizes breathing with the tones, the device gradually prolongs the exhalation tone (primarily) and slows the breathing rate to < 10 breaths/minute ("slow breathing"), as depicted in Figures 1 and 3. A record of the patient's use of the device is stored in the microprocessor for quantification of total time of device use and adherence to the regimen.

Principles of device-guided paced breathing: (1) monitoring breathing movements, (2) composing breathing-guiding tones, and (3) synchronizing breathing movements with the guiding tones.

Figure 3. Principles of device-guided paced breathing: (1) monitoring breathing movements, (2) composing breathing-guiding tones, and (3) synchronizing breathing movements with the guiding tones.

How Does RESPeRATE Work?

click here for a flash demo.

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