Eagle Barrett Syndrome (Also Known as Prune-Belly Syndrome [PBS]) in an Adult

Christopher Wen, MD; Dorothy J. Marquez, MD; Allen J. Cohen, PhD, MD

Disclosures

Appl Radiol. 2004;33(4) 

In This Article

Case Summary

A 17-year-old Hispanic adolescent boy presented to the emergency department with a 6-hour history of right blank pain and hematuria. Recently, in a South American country, he had had a diagnosis of bilateral hydronephrosis and a right orchiectomy for an undescended testis. Laboratory results were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 11,000 and a urine analysis of 2+ white blood cells and 50 red blood cells/high-power field. The serum creatinine was 1.1 mg/dL. The clinicians suspected pyelonephritis, and a noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed (Figure 1). An intravenous urogram (IVU) was also obtained 12 days later (Figure 2). The patient was seen in the urology clinic, where a physical examination found a descended left testis and an empty right hemiscrotum. The patient was treated with antibiotics for a urine culture positive for Escherichia coli.

(A) Noncontrast axial CT scan at the level of the kidneys shows massive hydronephrosis, right greater than the left. (B) Axial CT image at a more caudal level reveals marked bilateral redundant hydroureter (white arrows), a thick-walled bladder (black arrow), and absent abdominal wall musculature.

(A) Noncontrast axial CT scan at the level of the kidneys shows massive hydronephrosis, right greater than the left. (B) Axial CT image at a more caudal level reveals marked bilateral redundant hydroureter (white arrows), a thick-walled bladder (black arrow), and absent abdominal wall musculature.

A postvoid radiograph from an intravenous urogram shows a poorly functioning right kidney with a massive poorly opaci-fied renal pelvis (single arrow), and marked left hydronephrosis with a tortuous enlarged distally redun-dant left ureter (double arrows).

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