The Who, What, Why, and How-To Guide for Gastrostomy Tube Placement in Infants

Angela Burd, RNC, MS(N), CCNS, APN-C, Randall S. Burd, MD, PhD

Disclosures

Adv Neonatal Care. 2003;3(4) 

In This Article

Types of Gastrostomy Tubes

There are several types of gastrostomy tubes available for infants, and they are defined and explained in detail in Table 1 . A gastrostomy tube has 3 components: the internal portion within the stomach (retention tip), the external portion (body) that is visible on or outside of the skin, and the feeding port (Fig 1). The internal portion of the tube or tip is either a balloon tip or a nonballoon tip (either a mushroom or a collapsible wing) catheter (Figs 2and 3). The external portion of the gastrostomy (body) may be a traditional tube (projecting out of the skin) or a skin-level device (button). For the initial insertion, a tube-type gastrostomy is often used (Fig 4), but this may be converted to a skin-level device (Figs 5 and 6) in about 6 to 12 weeks without forcibly separating the stomach from the abdominal wall.[3]

Anatomy of a gastrostomy tube. Reprinted with permission from Bordewick AJ, Bildner JI, Burd RS. An effective approach for preventing and treating gastrostomy tube complications in newborns. Neonatal Network. 2001;20:38–39.

Endoscopic appearance of the inflated internal balloon of a gastrostomy tube. Reprinted with permission from David M. Martin, MD, Atlas of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, www.EndoAtlas.com.

Endoscopic appearance of the internal portion of a mushroom tip button gastrostomy. Reprinted with permission from David M. Martin, MD, Atlas of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, www.EndoAtlas.com.

MIC gastrostomy balloon tip tube-type gastrostomy. Reprinted with permission from Kimberly-Clark Ballard Medical.

MIC-KEY skin-level gastrostomy (balloon tip). Reprinted with permission from Kimberly-Clark Ballard Medical.

Bard button replacement gastrostomy device (mushroom type catheter). Photograph courtesy of Bard Endoscopic Technologies.

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