Enhanced External Counterpulsation in Patients With Heart Failure: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

Ozlem Soran, MD, Bruce Fleishman, MD, Theresa Demarco, MD, William Grossman, MD, Virginia M. Schneider, RN, Karen Manzo, RN, Paul-André de Lame, MD, Arthur M. Feldman, MD, PhD

Disclosures

CHF. 2002;8(4) 

In This Article

Exercise Tolerance Tests

In the 23 patients who had a 1-week post-treatment follow-up, peak oxygen uptake (Figure 1) increased significantly from the mean baseline value of 14.99 to a mean of 15.98 mL/kg/min (change+7.45%; SE±3.57%, min-27.09%, max+43.57%; p=0.05).

Change in peak oxygen uptake (Vo2) p values (baseline vs. 1 week and 6 month): overall (p=0.08, p<0.01); idiopathic (p=0.54, p<0.05); ischemic (p=0.09, p<0.01)

In the 19 patients who had a 6-month post-treatment follow-up including an exercise tolerance test, peak oxygen uptake increased significantly from the mean baseline value of 14.78 to a mean of 18.41 mL/kg/min (change+27.09%, SE±4.71%, min-0.46%, max+62.76%; p<0.001).

At the 1-week follow-up, overall mean exercise duration increased significantly from 627.63 sec at baseline to 732.96 sec (change+20.53%, SE±4.89%, min-7.66%, max+89.58%; p<0.001).

At the 6-month follow-up, overall mean exercise duration increased significantly from 637.13 sec at baseline to 715.17 sec (change+15.55%, SE±6.53%, min-15.20%, max+81.02%; p=0.028).

Exercise capacity, as measured by peak oxygen uptake and exercise duration, increased similarly in the idiopathic and the ischemic groups (between-population p values: peak oxygen uptake 0.408; exercise duration 0.218).

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