Soft Tissue and Cartilage Infection by Salmonella oranienburg in a Healthy Girl

South Med J. 2001;94(4) 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Focal extraintestinal infections from nontyphoid salmonellae have increased in incidence during the past decade. Typically, they are manifested as either osteomyelitis or meningitis as a complication of either bacteremia or enteric fever. Isolated salmonellal soft tissue infections, however, are rare and occur mostly in adults with chronic underlying conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, diabetes mellitus, and cell-mediated immunity defects. We report a case of an otherwise healthy adolescent who was exposed to a guinea pig with a skin mass. She subsequently had an isolated soft tissue infection with cartilaginous involvement of the anterior chest wall due to Salmonella enterica serogroup C1 (bioserotype oranienburg).

Salmonellosis in the pediatric population may manifest itself as gastroenteritis, enteric fever, bacteremia, localized infections outside the gastrointestinal tract, and a chronic carrier state.[1] Localized infections are relatively rare and occur in patients with chronic underlying conditions such as HIV, sickle cell anemia, and diabetes mellitus. We describe the case of a healthy girl who had a soft tissue infection with cartilaginous involvement of the anterior chest wall due to Salmonella enterica serogroup C1 (bioserotype oranienburg).

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