Butenafine 1% Versus Terbinafine 1% in Cream for the Treatment of Tinea Pedis: A Placebo Controlled, Double-Blind, Comparative Study

Tanweer A. Syed, Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Suhail M. Hadi, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Zulfiqar A. Qureshi, Medical Faculty, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan; Shahida M. Ali, Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Seyed Ali Ahmad, Pacific Union College, Angwin, California, USA

Clin Drug Invest. 2000;19(6) 

In This Article

Discussion

The findings of this study indicate that butenafine 1% in cream applied once daily for 5 consecutive days per week appeared to be comparatively more effective than terbinafine 1% in cream and placebo to cure plantar or moccasin-type tinea pedis in men. The study showed that butenafine 1% in cream caused more rapid and persistent clearing of tinea pedis signs and symptoms (1 week vs 2 weeks) and cured more patients (90%) in a shorter period of time (1 week, 5 topical applications only), with no relapse, than terbinafine 1% cream and placebo. These agents cured 80% and 10% of patients, respectively, after 2 weeks of treatment with one relapse in each treatment group. The lack of relapse in the butenafine group may be attributed to its potent fungicidal activity and long retention in the skin.[8,9,10] Moreover, a recent study has reported that as compared with other anti-mycotics in the allylamine group, butenafine has shown better inherent anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.[11] Overall, the results of this study are comparatively much better than those of other similar studies comparing butenafine 1% cream or terbinafine 1% cream with other antimycotic agents used to treat tinea pedis.[12,13,14,15]

In conclusion, the clinical findings of the present study demonstrate that butenafine 1% in cream is well tolerated and comparatively better (90% cure within 1 week and no relapse) than terbinafine (80% cure after 2 weeks and 1 relapse after 11 months) and placebo (10% cure after 2 weeks and 1 relapse after 11 months) for the treatment of plantar or moccasin-type tinea pedis in men. Further clinical studies appear warranted.

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