Fallopian Tube Torsion: Laparoscopic Evaluation and Treatment of a Rare Gynecological Entity

Haim Krissi, MD, Josef Shalev, MD, Itai Bar-Hava, MD, Rami Langer, MD, Arie Herman, MD, and Boris Kaplan, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tiqva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

J Am Board Fam Med. 2001;14(4) 

In This Article

Abstract and Introduction

Background: Fallopian tube torsion is a cause for acute low abdominal pain that is difficult to diagnose. The purpose of this article is to review the available data on and to update clinicians regarding its diagnosis and treatment in the era of laparoscopic surgery.
Methods: We searched in MEDLINE and EMBASE and reviewed the lists of references. The keywords used were "laparoscopy," "fallopian tube," and "torsion."
Results and Conclusion: Fallopian tube torsion is an uncommon cause for acute low abdominal pain in women. Because it has no pathognomonic clinical symptoms or findings on imaging or laboratory studies, a history of current or past pelvic pathologic conditions or surgery, as well as pregnancy, should draw the attention of the attending physician to its occurrence. Early laparoscopy is the reference standard in the diagnosis and treatment.

Fallopian tube torsion is a rare gynecologic cause of acute low abdominal pain. Several hundred cases have been reported in the literature since the original description by Bland-Sutton in 1890.[1] The lack of pathognomonic symptoms, clinical findings on physical examination, and specific imaging or laboratory characteristics makes this entity difficult to diagnose preoperatively, which can cause surgical intervention to be postponed. In the past surgical repair was performed by laparotomy. The introduction of laparoscopy for routine use in gynecology has changed the approach to both the diagnosis and treatment of fallopian tube torsion.

The purpose of this article is to review the available data on this rare entity and to update clinicians regarding its diagnosis and treatment in the era of laparoscopic surgery.

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