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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Burnout is an ongoing part of many physicians' lives, and for some it can even lead to suicide. This part of Medscape's Lifestyle Report looks at how often obstetricians and gynecologists experience burnout, as well as how happy they are in their personal lives and how they spend their time outside of work.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Working as an ob/gyn often entails frustration and challenges. Compared with other specialists, ob/gyns are about in the middle of the pack. Only 27% of ob/gyns in Medscape's survey responded that they were very or extremely happy.

Some totals in this presentation do not equal 100% due to rounding.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

In general, all physicians are happier outside of work than at work, including ob/gyns. About half of ob/gyns are either very or extremely happy outside of work.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

The percentage of ob/gyns who are burned out is about the same as that of burned-out physicians overall (44%). Ob/gyns' rates of reported colloquial and clinical depression are slightly more than those of physicians overall (11% and 4%, respectively).

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Ob/gyns rely on a mix of positive coping skills and potentially destructive behaviors to deal with burnout. Among all physicians, exercise was the chief method of coping with burnout (48%).

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Many factors lead to burnout. The top one is having too many administrative tasks, followed by receiving too little compensation or reimbursement; more time devoted to the EHR; lack of respect from administrators, colleagues, or staff; and spending too many hours at work.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Of those ob/gyns who say that they are depressed, 44% believe that it has no impact on patient interactions. Those who do admit that patient care is affected cite feeling more exasperated with patients and possibly being less careful when taking patient notes.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Depression's effects are not limited to patient interactions. For the large majority of depressed ob/gyns, the condition expresses itself in some aspect of their work behavior.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Twenty percent of ob/gyns who are burned out, depressed, or both admitted to having had thoughts of suicide. That's more than the percentage of all such physicians who said they had had suicidal thoughts (14%) or had attempted suicide (1%).

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

The majority of ob/gyns don't seek help. Many physicians have rationalized their exhaustion and discontent, noting that other physicians feel it too. Others say they don't think their degree of unhappiness is bad enough to require outside help.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Increasingly, hospitals and large healthcare organizations offer physician wellness programs for reducing stress and burnout. Ob/gyns who noted that their employer did not offer such a program, or that they didn't know whether a program was available at their workplace, were split about how likely they would be to use one were it offered.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Slightly more than half of ob/gyns (55%) describe their self-esteem as high or very high. Our survey results show that self-esteem varies within the specialties: Plastic surgeons (73%), urologists (68%), and ophthalmologists (67%) have among the highest self-esteem, while internists (50%), oncologists (48%), and infectious disease specialists (47%) come in at the bottom of that scale.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Ob/gyns are similar to all physicians in that the large majority are married or in a committed relationship. The percentage of single ob/gyns (8%) is similar to the overall physician average of 7%.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Overall, 84% of physicians say their marriage is either good or very good. For ob/gyns, that percentage is 82%. Among physicians who describe their marriage as very good, ob/gyns, at 50%, are toward the low end of the scale, along with anesthesiologists (47%), cardiologists (47%), and psychiatrists (45%). Happiest are otolaryngologists (67%), plastic surgeons (64%), and urologists (64%).

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Ob/gyns spend about the same amount of time as physicians overall (70% of whom spend 1-10 hours) on personal use of the Internet. Data from USC Annenberg found that the average American spends 24 hours online a week, up from 9.4 hours in 2000.[1]

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

The large majority of ob/gyns spend from 1 to 10 hours per week on the Internet for professional use. Twenty percent spend 11 hours or more per week online for work-related purposes, compared with 22% of physicians overall.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

For ob/gyns, Toyota, BMW, and Honda are among the top makes. For physicians overall, the top two are Toyota and Honda, followed by BMW, Ford, Lexus, and Mercedes-Benz.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Forty-seven percent of ob/gyns take from 3 to 4 weeks of vacation annually, similar to physicians overall (43%). Twenty-three percent of ob/gyns take 5 weeks or more, the same percentage as physicians overall.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Among all physicians in our survey, 70% say they have a spiritual or religious belief, similar to the percentage of ob/gyns. In Medscape's 2012 Lifestyle Report, 83% of physicians said they have a belief system.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

Among all physicians, 35% exercise at least four times a week, just over a third exercise two or three times a week, and just under a third exercise once a week or less (including never). A similar percentage of ob/gyns (33%) exercise at least four times a week.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

About 44% of ob/gyns average less than one drink per week or are non-drinkers. For physicians overall, that figure is 47%. Among all physicians, 8% have at least seven drinks per week, the same percentage as ob/gyns.

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

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Medscape Obstetrician & Gynecologist Lifestyle, Happiness & Burnout Report 2019

Leslie Kane, MA | February 20, 2019 | Contributor Information

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Medscape National Physician Burnout, Depression & Suicide Report 2019

More than 15,000 physicians told Medscape how they feel about burnout, depression, and suicidal thoughts, and also how they attain happiness.Medscape Features Slideshows, January 2019
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