DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

Medscape's Family Medicine Expert Video Commentaries. presented in collaboration with faculty from the Department of Family Medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center, explores a range of clinical and policy issues that affect the practice of family medicine. Readers are encouraged to post reactions and questions in the commenting links at the conclusion of each commentary in the series.

  • Dense Breasts: Who Needs More Imaging?   Most states now require informing women that mammograms may not pick up cancers in dense breasts. How does this change breast cancer screening?
  • Colorectal Cancer: To Screen or Not?   Patient preferences and values matter as much--or more--than guidelines, argues Kenny Lin.
  • Should We Even Talk About a PSA?   Bring it up? Wait for the patient to bring it up? How does the patient even know whether to bring it up?
  • New Payment Models for Primary Care: Band-Aid or Cure?   Will new payment models that cut administrative burdens and reward physicians for keeping patients healthy rescue primary care? Time will tell.
  • Lung Cancer Screening: False Positives and True Benefits   We have a duty to discuss these harms with patients when they are deciding on lung cancer screening.
  • I Hate the ROS That time-consuming, sometimes numbing task has virtually no evidence to supports its inclusion in a standard H&P.
  • How Can Busy Family Docs Take on Another Role?   Kenny Lin wants to 'raise the bar' for population health in family practice.
  • Well-Woman Care: The Evidence That Less Is More   The times they are a-changing when it comes to screening well women for cancer and other conditions. Dr Kenny Lin reviews the current state of evidence.
  • A Game-Changer to Prevent Cognitive Loss? Maybe Not   Does intensive blood pressure control prevent cognitive loss? Perhaps, but at what cost?
  • Marketing e-Cigarettes: New Product, Same Tactics The cat-and-mouse game between the tobacco industry and medical and public health organizations has now moved to a new front: marketing of e-cigarettes and other nicotine delivery systems.