AIDS Year in Review

 
 

AIDS Year in Review

  • Hurry Up and Stop: The Global Fund's Bumpy Inaugural Year The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was rushed into existence in 2002, a bold new initiative to fight three diseases crippling the developing world.
  • Global Coalition Aims to Ramp Up ARV Access In July 2001, a sense of urgency about Africa's plight drove world leaders to meet in New York for an extraordinary United Nations General Assembly Special Session on AIDS (UNGASS), where they issued a Declaration of their commitment to fighting AIDS and set up the Global Fund to get the ball rolling.
  • Global AIDS When I started treatment 6 years ago, I only had 2 CD4 cells/l.
  • Latino Drug-Recycling Group Distributes Hope in a Bottle Across Latin America, a tiny band of activist volunteers is helping to change the nature of the AIDS epidemic, by converting the uninitiated into advocates and peer educators -- and keeping them alive.
  • Beyond Antiretroviral Access: Low-Cost Laboratory Tests Needed Antiretroviral (ARV) price reductions and generic availability in resource-limited countries (RLC) are allowing greater treatment access for the estimated 5.5 million adults for whom therapy is indicated.
  • Bush on AIDS: Competing Moral Imperatives Following President Bush's proposal of the Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief during his 2003 State of the Union Address, responses from the press, pundits, and representatives of virtually every type of US and international AIDS organization ranged from blithe credulity to scathing cynicism.
  • African Cries Compound the Epidemic's Wrath The situation in many parts of Southern Africa is grim, according to Dan Mullins, HIV/AIDS coordinator at Oxfam GB South Africa.
  • 'HAART Optimism': Is it Really the Problem with HIV Prevention 'As drug regimens become easier to take, with less side effects, there is more treatment optimism,' says Dr. Carol Ciesielski, Chicago-based researcher and Chief of HIV/STD Epidemiology for the Chicago Department of Public Health.
  • Despite the Data, HIV Harm Reduction Programs Remain a Hard Sell ''Drug users are marginalized and disconnected from the medical system, with abstinence proclaimed as the only worthy goal of drug treatment,' says Alex Khachatrian, a Russia-based program assistant for the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).
  • Virus-Host Interactions: Role of HIV Proteins Vif, Tat, and Rev The primary goal of a virus is the replication of its genome in an appropriate host cell and the production of progeny virions for the infection of new target cells.
  • CD4-Independent Infection of HIV and SIV: Implication for The primate immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) are enveloped viruses that normally require successive interactions with CD4 and a co-receptor to trigger the fusion of viral and cellular membranes and entry into cells.
  • Growing in Silence: Selected Regions and Countries With The AIDS epidemic has killed over 20 million people worldwide, including more than 3 million in 2002 alone, and an estimated 5 million people acquired HIV in 2002, bringing to 42 million the number of people globally living with the virus.
  • The Impact of Host Genetics on HIV Infection and Disease Suspicion that host genetic factors determine variability in the course of natural HIV-1 infection deepened throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, but only relatively recently have we recognized the impact of human genetic variation on HIV/AIDS as a complex phenomenon.
  • New Observations on CD8 Cell Responses Most HIV vaccine development programs target the induction of strong, broad, high-affinity HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses directed against several HIV antigens.
  • Role of Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Infection The year 2002 is considered by some as the year during which a revival in interest in anti-HIV neutralizing antibodies took place.
  • Present Status of Human HIV Vaccine Development The AIDS epidemic continues to grow worldwide.
  • New Antiretroviral Drugs and Approaches to HIV Treatment The favorable impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients is constrained by the limited durability of the efficacy of antiretroviral combinations.
  • Neutralizing Antibodies as a Potential Secondary Protective The precise definition of the immune correlates of protection against HIV infection is still elusive.
  • B Cell Activation in Peripheral Blood and Lymph Nodes During HIV Paradoxical B cell activation, and the consequent hypergammaglobulinaemia, is one of the most characteristic features of the intricate immune impairment observed in HIV infection.
  • Analysis of the Mitochondrial DNA Genome in the Peripheral Blood Highly active antiretroviral therapy consists of a cocktail of different drugs which almost completely suppress HIV replication.