Mandrola on Medscape

 
 
  • We Can't Ignore the Harms of Social Distancing With the emphasis on social distancing and mitigating the effects of SARS-CoV-2, John Mandrola, MD, asks that we don't forget to add iatrogenic deaths to our final tally.
  • Dear Gilead: Please Add a Placebo Arm to Remdesivir Trial A randomized trial of the antiviral remdesivir for the treatment of COVID-19 is underway but its open label design and lack of a placebo control raises concerns for John Mandrola, MD
  • COVID-19 and PPE: Some of Us Will Die A storm is coming, and the new fear is the shortage of personal protective equipment, warns John Mandrola, MD, of the COVID19 pandemic as some hospitals bar physicians from complaining.
  • Will the Coronavirus Pandemic Trim the Nonsense? 'From the beginning of this pandemic, I have felt a smallness to much of what I do in electrophysiology,' admits John Mandrola, MD.
  • Independent NPs and PAs: A Doc's View Nurse practitioners and physician assistants increasingly manage patient care independently. While professional physician organizations cry foul, this doctor is not alarmed.
  • Have We Missed the Hidden Cause of Medical Overuse? A recent book suggests that we?re programmed to value the rituals of caring even when there is no obvious medical benefit. John Mandrola, MD, sees a lot of such low-value conspicuous caring in medicine.
  • The Year?s Most Important Study Adds to Uncertainty in Science One data set, one question, yet 29 research teams came to varying findings. John Mandrola, MD, learns that how the data are analyzed is an oft-ignored important factor in evaluating studies.
  • The Physician Behind the PREDIMED Retraction   Dr John Mandrola interviews Dr John Carlisle about the methodology he uses to uncover previously unrecognized flaws in randomized controlled trials.
  • Yes, There Is Low-Value Care in the Very Ill, Despite MIT Study Mandrola and Prasad fear that a study showing high cost of care at end of life but little ability to predict who will die will be misinterpreted and worsen the crisis of end-of-life care.
  • How Hubris Impairs the Care of the Elderly Some conditions in older adults warrant treatment; some do not. The wise physician knows the difference.
  • When Evidence Doesn't Persuade Dr Mandrola debated stenting in stable CAD. He had data on his side, but his opponent triumphed with pictures of scary-looking blockages. Why is the plumbing analogy of CAD so difficult to dispel?
  • In Defense of Less-Is-More Cardiologist and New England Journal of Medicine correspondent, Lisa Rosenbaum, MD recently critiqued the less-is-more in medicine crusaders. One such crusader, Dr Mandrola, respectfully disagrees.
  • Freedom of Speech Is Also Needed in Health and Medicine Suppression of alternative ideas and healthy debate is not just a college campus issue--it's affecting medicine too, warns Dr Mandrola.
  • A Corrosive Force in Medical Care Are RVUs slowly but surely killing the art of medicine?
  • ADA The Last Remnants of the Crumbling Ivory Tower: Social Media Changes Everything Will social media be the last straw to bring the ivory tower down? Dr John Mandrola lists the reasons.
  • Want More Trust in Medical Science? Embrace Uncertainty and Cut the Hype On Earth Day, concerned citizens will March to defend the virtues of science. Dr Mandrola explores reasons that mainstream medical science has developed a problem with trust.
  • Estimating Risk/Benefit: Facts Are a Basic Requirement A recent study finds that clinicians are often wrong when estimating benefits and harms of a medical intervention.
  • Medical Debate Belongs in the Public Space Dr John Mandrola strenuously disagrees with those who argue that medicine should hold its scientific debates behind closed doors.
  • Avoiding Cynicism Is Getting Harder Dr John Mandrola details five recent news events that illustrate the confluence of healthcare and industry that have fueled his recent cynicism.
  • Maybe Doctors Don't Die So Differently Dying doctors go gently into the night, right? A new study suggests that they are just as likely to rack up hospital stays in their final months as nonphysicians. Is the death-denial culture to blame?