Anesthesiology News

 
 
  • A Surgeon So Bad It Was Criminal Christopher Duntsch's surgical outcomes were so outlandishly poor that Texas prosecuted him for harming patients.
  • Despite Red Flags at Surgery Centers, Overseers Award Gold Seals State-approved accreditation agencies gave gold seals of approval to surgery centres, according to a review of doctors' disciplinary records, court files, and accreditor reports.
  • ATA 2018ATA Annual Meeting Includes Potpourri of Thyroid Topics Thyroid experts, practitioners, and researchers gather amid pressing issues of advanced cancers, hypo- and hyperthyroid disease challenges, and ever-evolving technologies.
  • QCS 2018Risk for Opioid-Related Death Very Low in Cancer Patients Cancer patients have a far lower risk for opioid-related death compared to the general population.
  • Sutureless Gastroschisis Tied to Significant Benefits but Higher Hernia Risk Compared to sutured closure, sutureless gastroschisis is associated with a significant reduction in pain medication requirements and mechanical ventilation duration but may increase the risk of umbilical hernia, researchers say.
  • NEJM Editor Jeffrey Drazen to Retire One of the most venerated medical journals, the NEJM has also faced its fair share of controversy during the past few years; what lies ahead after Drazen leaves?
  • Rare Harms Linked to Silicone Implants in New Study An analysis of postmarket data showed strong ties between silicone breast implants and autoimmune diseases. Citing multiple study design flaws, the FDA urged caution in interpreting the data.
  • House Advances Broad Opioid Package; Senate Vote Next Although there was strong bipartisan support for the opioid package, lawmakers including a Texas physician already are looking for additional ways to combat abuse of drugs such as fentanyl.
  • Alnylam's Gene-Silencing Drug Shows Efficacy in Late-Stage Trial Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc said on Thursday its gene-silencing drug for a rare, painful genetic disease was found to be effective in a late-stage trial, putting the firm on track for a faster approval from U.S. regulator.
  • More Clinicians Should Get Flu Vaccination, CDC Says Although most healthcare workers received influenza vaccinations during the 2017-2018 season, vaccination rates were lowest for staff working with the most vulnerable patients, researchers report.
  • Depression Tied to Arthritis Pain Depressed individuals over age 50 should be screened for arthritis pain because the two conditions often occur together, worsening mental and physical health outcomes, researchers say.
  • Fewer US Adults Getting Unnecessary Knee Surgery Arthroscopic knee surgery is being done less often in adults with torn cartilage or painful arthritis, as a growing body of evidence shows little benefit from these operations, a U.S. study suggests.
  • New Strategy Almost Halves Opioid Use in Surgical Cancer Patients A two-prong approach was able to reduce opioid use by 46% in post-op surgical patients without increasing pain or anxiety.
  • Value of Invasive Procedures for Knee, Back Pain Questioned A new meta-analysis provides little evidence to support use of invasive interventional procedures for chronic knee and low back pain, researchers conclude.
  • Chronic Pain Now Affects 50 Million US Adults A new CDC report notes that about 50 million Americans are experiencing chronic pain and that 20 million have 'high-impact' chronic pain that interferes with life or work activities.
  • Coke Eyeing Cannabis-Infused Drink Market Coca Cola Co said on Monday it was closely watching the growing marijuana-infused drinks market, responding to a media report that the world's largest beverage maker was in talks with Canada's Aurora Cannabis Inc.
  • Post-Op Opioids Used Far More in US Than Hong Kong Head and neck surgery patients in Hong Kong are far less likely to be prescribed opioids than patients undergoing similar surgeries in the U.S., new research shows.
  • FDA Expands Strategies for Safer Opioid Prescribing The FDA announced today that it will be enlisting several new strategies to improve provider education about opioids as well as informing patients about the risks associated with opioid use.
  • Laser Treatment Improves Burn Scars of "Napalm Girl" More than four decades after sustaining extensive napalm burns, the Vietnamese woman who became known as "Napalm Girl" experienced significant improvement in her pain and burn scars with laser treatment.
  • Lack of Surgical Care in US Prisons May Cost Lives Poor healthcare in America's prisons may be leading to avoidable deaths, a new study suggests.