Urology News

 
 
  • Incontinence Drug May Help Sleep Dysfunction in Older Women An antimuscarinic agent used to treat urinary incontinence improves sleep quality as well as bladder symptoms in older women, new research shows.
  • Alternative Surgery for Peyronie's Disease Avoids Prosthesis Implant Surgery that combines penile revascularization with penile corrective techniques is an effective alternative to prosthesis implantation in some men with Peyronie's disease that is accompanied by erectile dysfunction, researchers from Turkey report.
  • Pregnant Women Often Prescribed Unsafe Antibiotics Four in 10 pregnant women diagnosed with a urinary tract infection in the first trimester received antibiotics linked to birth defects, according to an analysis of national insurance claims data.
  • Endocrinologist Allegedly Ran Pill Mill, Murdered His Wife An endocrinologist has been charged with the murder of his wife almost 6 years after she was shot dead. Prosecutors say he was embroiled in a scheme with a motorcycle gang to illegally prescribe opiates.
  • FDA Panel Votes Down Oral Testosterone Replacement Products FDA advisers were primarily concerned about risk of cardiovascular side effects, which they felt could become a problem, particularly with off-label use of such products, which they believe is widespread
  • This Gene Test Might Guide PSA Screening: Two Views A new gene test may offer a way to identify men who would benefit from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer, say investigators. But an expert is not convinced at this time.
  • Complete Handoffs by Anesthesiologists Tied to Poor Outcomes Complete handovers during anesthesia care are associated with adverse postoperative patient outcomes, new data showed.
  • 'Very-Low-Risk' Bladder Cancer Described Younger patients with smaller tumors have low recurrence and need prolonged surveillance.
  • For Five Cancers, Screening Skews Risk Factors Cancer risk factors are typically based on characteristics at the time of diagnosis. In a new essay, a pair of major figures on the US cancer scene explain why that is a problem when cancers are detected by testing.
  • Lymphadenectomy in Renal Cell Carcinoma: No Benefit? A secondary analysis of the ASSURE trial reveals that lymph node removal does not improve survival in high-risk renal cell carcinoma.
  • Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injury Common in Surgeons The problem is so significant that some experts have referred to it as 'an impending epidemic,' and fear it may contribute to the projected shortage of surgeons in coming years.
  • Genitourinary Problems Worse for Sexually Abused Girls A study finds much higher prevalence than in the general population. The results may help physicians intervene early with abused girl patients to prevent chronic problems.
  • Mid-urethral Sling Limits Urinary Incontinence After Sacrocolpopexy In women undergoing sacrocolpopexy, use of a retropubic mid-urethral sling leads to higher stress-specific continence rates at one and two years than does Burch retropubic urethropexy, according to a secondary analysis of a randomized trial.
  • Transgender Women May Get Small Breasts With Hormones Transgender women who take sex hormones to feminize their bodies may not experience as much breast development as they expect, a new European study suggests.
  • France's Sanofi Pins Hopes on New Drugs After Setbacks French pharmaceuticals group Sanofi said on Wednesday it had suffered from low uptake for a new cholesterol drug and from concerns about a dengue vaccine, but expressed confidence its pipeline of new products would support long-term growth.
  • New FDA Web Page Has Latest Info on Best Antibiotic Choice A new FDA Web page will streamline how the agency updates information to help healthcare providers choose an appropriate antibiotic or antifungal agent for a patient’s infection.
  • Teen Acne Tied to Prostate Cancer Risk Swedish researchers report an association between acne -- particularly severe acne -- in the late teen years and later prostate cancer risk, a finding that validates other research.
  • Scientists Race to Regrow Lost Knee Cartilage About 14 million Americans have osteoarthritis of the knees severe enough to cause pain and inflammation, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and more people are getting the condition -- also known as OA -- as they age.
  • The Year in Medicine 2017: News That Made a Difference Read the news that got the most attention this year in medicine, including multiple hurricanes, the effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the opioid crisis (again), and much more.
  • RSNA New Prostate Cancer Imaging Tracer Improves Detection 18F-PSMA-1007, an emerging agent for prostate imaging, can improve the detection of lesions and the targeting of radiotherapy, new research shows.