Nature Clinical Practice Urology

 
 
  • Penile Enlargement Surgery-Fact or Illusion? Penile enlargement surgery, though extremely popular, receives very little formal scrutiny. The authors raise questions about the safety, and indeed efficacy, of this procedure.
  • Does Preservation of the Neurovascular Bundle During Radical The authors review a study from the Journal of Urology on the risks associated with preserving the neurovascular bundle during radical prostatectomy. Does this technique compromise cancer control?
  • Is Coronal CT Imaging a More Accurate Method of Measuring the In this commentary on an article from the Journal of Urology by Nadler and colleagues, the use of coronal images is held to be necessary only in "complex and difficult cases."
  • Mechanisms of Disease: Polymorphisms of Androgen Regulatory The authors briefly describe several androgen-related polymorphisms implicated in the development and progression of prostate cancer.
  • When and How to Use Informatics Tools in Caring for Urologic Michael Kattan assesses the utility of several Decision analysis nomograms for management of clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • Should the Uterus and Ovaries Be Removed, and the Vagina Women with muscle-invasive bladder cancer face removal of the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and part of the vagina. Will preservation of the gynecologic organs soon be feasible in some cases?
  • Can Prostate Cancer Be Prevented? Various dietary, lifestyle, and genetic factors have been associated with the risk of prostate cancer. With enough study of these factors will it be possible to prevent the disease?
  • Treatment of Chronic Prostatitis What do we know about chronic prostatitis? Very little. In fact, it may not even be a disease of the prostate. It is time for urologists to re-examine old dogma.
  • Should Men With Serum PSA Levels of 4.0 ng/mL or Less Undergo a Recent reassessment of the utility of PSA levels in diagnosing prostate cancer has changed the way many urologists advise their patients. But PSA, however imperfect, is still the best marker we have.