Ovarian Cancer News

 
 
  • Jury Orders J&J to Pay $550 Mln in Missouri Asbestos Cancer Case A Missouri jury on Thursday found Johnson & Johnson liable in a lawsuit filed by 22 women who alleged the company's talc-based products, including J&J Baby Powder, contain asbestos and caused them ovarian cancer, and ordered the company to pay $550 million in compensatory damages.
  • Scans Increasingly Catch Incidentalomas That Are Rarely Problematic Advanced imaging tests for many common health problems may catch something else entirely: incidentalomas that can create anxiety about tumors but more often than not, don't turn out to be cancer, a research review suggests.
  • Breast and Gynecological Cancer Risk Is Minimal With IVF The study of more than 250,000 British women shows reassuring data on breast cancer risk; there is an increased ovarian cancer risk but it is small and limited to those with existing risk factors.
  • American Medical Organizations Denounce US Breastfeeding Stance Leading medical organizations representing public health physicians, pediatricians, family physicians, obstetricians, and gynecologists have criticized US government tactics at a UN health assembly earlier this year.
  • WCGC 2018Explosion in GI Cancer Drugs 'Confusing for Clinicians' Clinicians have a confusing picture of which drugs to choose for gastrointestinal cancers, owing to the way trials are designed, although help is at hand from clinical assessment tools, argue experts.
  • ASCO 2018Emojis Help Cancer Patients Report Symptoms, QoL Wearable technologies and emoji mood scales could be the future of patient-reported outcome assessment in cancer patients, suggested a US study presented at the world's largest cancer meeting.
  • In Missouri, J&J Faces Biggest Trial Yet Alleging Talc Caused Cancer A lawsuit by 22 ovarian cancer patients against Johnson & Johnson went to trial on Wednesday in Missouri state court, marking the largest case the company has faced over allegations its talc-based products contain cancer-causing asbestos.
  • J&J Must Pay $4 Mln in Punitive Damages in Asbestos Cancer Trial A California jury on Thursday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4 million in punitive damages to a woman who said she developed cancer after being exposed to asbestos in the company's baby powder, pushing the total damages award in the case to $25.7 million.
  • Obamacare Tied to Earlier Cancer Detection in Young Women Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision allowing adult children to stay on their parents' health insurance policy until age 26, young women with gynecological cancers were diagnosed and treated sooner, researchers say.
  • Men Much Less Likely Than Women to Get BRCA Testing, Despite Risks Although BRCA1/2 mutations put men at increased risk of breast, prostate and other cancers, they are significantly less likely than women to undergo genetic testing for these variants, researchers say.
  • Estrogen Safe After Oophorectomy in BRCA Mutation Carriers Use of estrogen-alone hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after oophorectomy does not increase the risk of BRCA 1-associated breast cancer, although this may not be the case for progesterone-continuing HRT, researchers say.
  • Male BRCA Carriers at Increased Risk of Many Cancers Men with germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are at increased cancer risk and may benefit from wider screening than is currently done, according to Israeli researchers.
  • J&J Baby Powder Litigation Takes New Focus With Asbestos Claims A $117 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson and a supplier in favor of a man who said his asbestos-related cancer was caused by long-term use of J&J's Baby Powder could open a new front for thousands of cases claiming the widely-used product caused cancer.
  • J&J Loses Trial Over Claims Linking Cancer to Asbestos in Talc Johnson & Johnson suffered its first trial loss in a lawsuit claiming its talc-based products including Johnson's Baby Powder contain cancer-causing asbestos, with a New Jersey jury on Thursday ordering J&J and another company to pay $37 million in damages.
  • Are Patients Ready for Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing? Federal regulators are slowly opening a lid on direct-to-consumer genetic testing, allowing people to learn for themselves whether their DNA carries strands that may make them more likely to get some life-threatening diseases.
  • PapSEEK: Potential Screening Test for Gynecologic Cancers A multiplex panel that detects mutations in endometrial and ovarian cancers using samples from a routine Pap test and that also provides an analysis of aneuploidy may emerge as a screening tool.
  • Prior Chlamydia Infection and Doubled Risk for Ovarian Cancer Pelvic inflammatory disease, which is often caused by sexually transmitted disease, increases ovarian cancer risk; Chlamydia appears to double the risk.
  • Fall in European Colorectal Cancer Deaths a 'Major Success' Predicted cancer mortality for 2018 suggests that overall death rates across the EU have fallen substantially since 2012, with decreases of more than 6% for colorectal cancer, say researchers.
  • Carboplatin in Neoadjuvant Chemo May Be Helpful in Triple-negative Breast Cancer Carboplatin should be considered as a potential component of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women with high-risk, triple-negative breast cancer, regardless of BRCA status, researchers suggest.
  • Testicular Cancer Linked to Ovarian Cancer in Family Registry Study Men with testicular cancer are significantly more likely to have a mother with ovarian cancer than are men without the malignancy, according to a new Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry (FOCR) study.