Markman on Oncology

 
 
  • The Underutilization of Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy   Dr Maurie Markman expresses concern over a recent report illustrating the underuse of intraperitoneal chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, despite evidence that this therapy improves survival rates.
  • Adding Bevacizumab for Advanced Endometrial Cancer Dr Maurie Markman discusses the most clinically relevant research abstract on the gynecologic cancers as presented at ASCO 2015.
  • Gynecologic Cancers: New Regimens, Predictive Biomarkers   Dr Maurie Markman highlights a number of provocative trials assessing new treatment approaches to gynecologic cancer that will be presented at the 2015 ASCO annual meeting.
  • Olaparib Trial Offers a Look at Precision Medicine's Future   A recent trial of olaparib in ovarian cancer may be a landmark in the development of precision medicine, argues Dr Maurie Markman.
  • Survival After Surviving -- Estimating Late Recurrence Risk   How does recurrence risk change for a patient who has already survived ovarian cancer for a few years? Maurie Markman comments on a recent Journal of Clinical Oncology paper addressing the question.
  • Cervical Cancer Screening Rates 'Distressingly' Low   Dr Maurie Markman discusses a recent CDC survey revealing that 1 in 10 US adult women were not screened for cervical cancer during a recent 5-year period.
  • The Year in Gynecologic Cancer: Bevacizumab and Beyond Dr Maurie Markman highlights the most important developments and practice-changing clinical trials of 2014.
  • Too Soon for Broad BRCA Screening   Dr Maurie Markman discusses the controversy surrounding routine BRCA screening for breast and ovarian cancer and suggests that it is too soon for widespread genetic screening.
  • Bevacizumab's Role in Late-Stage Cervical Cancer   Dr. Maurie Markman discusses the recent FDA approval of bevacizumab for recurrent or late-stage cervical cancer and weighs the benefits of the drug in this setting against its toxicity profile.
  • The Molecular Tumor Board   Dr. Maurie Markman discusses the potential of 'molecular tumor boards' to interpret the genomic and genetic test results of cancer patients who do not have clear treatment options.
  • Reducing Patients' Symptom Burden in Cancer   Dr. Maurie Markman discusses the clinical importance of reducing ovarian cancer patients' symptoms, even when they do not clearly respond to treatment using typical measures like RECIST.
  • Ancestry Data in Cancer: Predictive, Prognostic, or Both?   Dr. Maurie Markman considers how genetic ancestry data might be used to predict risk for cancer relapse and inform potential ways to mitigate that risk.
  • Finding Anticancer Drugs in Unlikely Places   Dr. Maurie Markman considers the benefits of using drugs with relevant molecular targets as anticancer agents.
  • Revamp the FDA Drug-Approval Process   Dr. Maurie Markman advocates revamping outdated rules and regulations that stymie drug approval, including FDA reluctance to approve drugs on the basis of progression-free survival as an endpoint.
  • BRCA and Risk for Ovarian Cancer: There's More to the Story   Dr. Maurie Markman considers whether strategies known to reduce the risk for ovarian cancer might also be useful in women with a BRCA mutation.
  • Oophorectomy Prevents Ovarian Cancer   Dr. Maurie Markman suggests that the findings of this study be shared with women with the BRCA+ mutation.
  • Squamous Cell NSCLC: Finally Targetable?   Dr. Maurie Markman reviews a recent study looking at genetic mutations and possible therapeutic targets in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.
  • Uterine Cancer Surgery: The Clock Is Ticking   Dr. Maurie Markman reports on a Canadian study indicating that wait time between diagnosis of uterine cancer and surgery affects survival. What length of wait was associated with poorer prognosis?
  • Methylating Our Way to Predicting Cancer Treatment Outcomes Dr. Maurie Markman considers how DNA methylation signatures might be used to predict outcomes in patients with cancer.
  • Is 'Normal' Normal in Cancer Genomics? Dr. Maurie Markman considers how 'normal' genetic variants can influence cancer treatment outcome.