Johnson on Gastroenterology

 
 
  • Preventive Care for Patients With IBD: Time for Action   IBD puts patients at risk for a variety of non-GI disorders and requires their doctors to provide comprehensive care. Dr David Johnson reviews new guidelines that make this task easier.
  • Colon Ischemia: Don't Miss This   Dr David Johnson reviews the optimal diagnostic and treatment strategies for ischemic colitis, particularly isolated right-sided colon ischemia, a disease not to be missed.
  • Ten Pearls of Wisdom From Acute Pancreatitis Experts   A just-published review tackles the latest data on this increasingly prevalent disease. Dr David Johnson shares its most essential diagnostic and management recommendations.
  • Conference Highlights That Shouldn't Stay in Vegas: ACG 2016   Dr David Johnson provides his pick of the top 10 practice-changing presentations from this year's American College of Gastroenterology meeting.
  • New Reason Your Patients With HCV Will Say 'Thanks a Latte'   Dr David Johnson discusses exciting new research about the beneficial effect of coffee in patients with hepatitis C.
  • H pylori Treatment: The 'Rules' Have Changed   With drug resistance patterns changing, 14 days of quadruple therapy may be the new standard, explains Dr David Johnson.
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Three New Studies to Know   Dr David Johnson highlights the key take-home messages from three important recent studies on eosinophilic esophagitis.
  • It's a Wrap: A Look Back at the Highlights of DDW 2016   Dr David Johnson discusses some of the most important studies coming out of this year's Digestive Disease Week and reflects on the implications of these data in clinical gastroenterology.
  • Colon Cancer Screening Made Easier   What do you do when a patient refuses a colonoscopy? Dr David Johnson offers commentary on a new blood-based screening test for colon cancer.
  • Artificial Sweeteners: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing?   Noncaloric artificial sweeteners are widely used and also are frequently recommended to patients with prediabetes, diabetes, and obesity. But are they doing more harm than good?
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors and Dementia: Cause for Concern?   A recent study showed an association between dementia and the use of proton pump inhibitors. Dr David Johnson carefully analyzes this study and recommends how we should put these results into perspective.
  • How Real Is the Link Between PPI Use and Kidney Disease?   Recent news suggests that chronic renal insufficiency may develop with the use of proton pump inhibitors, but how real is the risk? Dr David Johnson provides his perspective.
  • New Guidelines on Acute Diverticulitis   Dr David Johnson discusses the new guidelines for acute diverticulitis from the American Gastroenterological Association and provides his perspective on the key take-home points for clinicians.
  • GI Wrap-up: Highlights From ACG 2015   Dr David Johnson discusses some of the key studies presented at this year's American College of Gastroenterology meeting and provides his perspective on what will be useful in clinical practice.
  • PPIs and Cardiac Risk: Unveiling the Mask of Truth   Dr David Johnson follows up on concerns about proton pump inhibitors and cardiovascular risk, setting the record straight.
  • PPIs and Cardiac Risk: Does It Pass the Sniff Test?   Dr David Johnson explains why he does not share the news media's concern about proton pump inhibitors and cardiovascular risk.
  • Keeping 'Tract': GI Updates From DDW 2015   Dr David Johnson provides a comprehensive review of the most interesting and intriguing topics that were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW) meeting.
  • Rifaximin for IBS: Where Do We Stand?   Dr David Johnson reviews the latest data on rifaximin treatment for diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Gauging Quality in Colonoscopy   Dr David Johnson takes you through the highlights of the new performance targets for quality colonoscopy -- from getting consent to reviewing results with patients.
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis: No Steroids Needed?   A new understanding of the natural history of eosinophilic esophagitis suggests that endoscopic dilation and a dysphagia diet may be a better way to go in steroid-naive adult patients.