Knowable Magazine

 
 
  • To Understand Airborne Transmission of Disease, Follow the Flow Viruses and bacteria travel in fluids, such as the air we breathe. Studying exhalations, toilet flushes, and raindrops can sharpen the big-picture view of how to prevent infections.
  • Why Don't Kids Tend To Get as Sick From COVID-19? Some children have been hospitalized and some have died, but at a tiny fraction of the adult rate. As children head back to school, scientists are hoping that research will provide answers.
  • What Will History Say About COVID? All of us are curators now, and what we preserve — as well as what we don't — will write the pandemic story.
  • What Sweden's COVID Failure Tells Us About Ageism Experts say that growing age discrimination in the West is a result of policies that far predate the pandemic.
  • Heads Up! The Cardiovascular Secrets of Giraffes Because of their height, giraffes require scarily high blood pressures — yet they escape the massive health problems that plague people with hypertension. Can clinicians learn from these animals?
  • Four Ways HIV Activists Have Saved Lives During COVID We owe these early fighters a debt of gratitude for transforming our response to public health crises.
  • Know the Enemy: Why Genetic Sequencing Is Key to Tracking COVID The US effort to analyze viral genomes, slow to start, is now picking up speed.
  • Friendly Fire: How Autoantibodies Could Drive Severe COVID People who were hospitalized with severe COVID-19 had plenty of antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but they also had a diverse set of antibodies against their own body's tissues and molecules.
  • The Challenges of Antiviral Treatments Antibiotics abound, but virus-fighting drugs are harder to come by, and COVID-19 amply shows how much we need them. Fortunately, scientists are getting better at making and finding them.
  • The Dash to Adapt Smartwatches to Help Detect COVID Infections Wearable devices already collect vital signs like heart rate and skin temperature. New algorithms can use them to catch illness early leading to urgent efforts to help battle the pandemic.
  • A New Way of Looking at Concussions Emerging research suggests that even mild hits to the head may damage the tiny lymphatic vessels that clear toxic chemicals and cellular debris from the brain.
  • How to Help COVID-19 Long-Haulers Patients with lingering symptoms need access to specialized clinics — and so much more.
  • Agents of Change: How Computers Are Mapping Covid-19's Future Traffic planners, securities traders and military strategists all use it. Simulating the behavior of idiosyncratic individuals may be the way to understand complex phenomena like pandemics.
  • Pandemic Puts All Eyes on Public Health Covid-19 has exposed the weak spots of the US public health system — and that presents an opportunity, says an epidemiologist, for the nation to recognize the problems and act to fix them.
  • Seven Ways to Fix This Pandemic -- and Stop the Next One When I think of all the steps we should have taken, and how many deaths could have been avoided, my head spins. But some lessons are crystal clear.
  • Wanted: Online Gamers to Help Build a More Stable Covid-19 Vaccine It turns out that big groups of humans are better — significantly so — at coming up with brand-new RNA structures than even the latest kinds of artificial intelligence.
  • Viruses That Come to Stay Some linger in the body for a lifetime. The one causing Covid-19 probably isn't one of them, but it and others can create mischief long after the immune system appears to have banished them.
  • The New Neuroscience of Stuttering After centuries of misunderstanding, research has finally tied the speech disorder to certain genes and brain alterations ― and new treatments may be on the horizon.
  • The Race to Develop Paper-Based Tests for Coronavirus Scientists are working at breakneck speed to develop inexpensive tools that take only minutes to tell if someone is infected -- a feat that could pave the way for a safer return to normalcy.
  • Matching Meals to Metabolism Two given people can respond to identical diets in different ways, contributing to varied health outcomes and patterns of disease.