WebMD Health News

 
 
  • FDA: Skin Absorbs Dangerous Sunscreen Chemicals Of the six active ingredients tested, some levels continued to be elevated beyond the FDA's threshold of concern 3 weeks after participants stopped putting them on their skin.
  • For Trans Kids, a Tough Path to Gender Harmony Roughly 1.8% of high school students now identify as trans, almost twice the rate of adults. The biggest jump appears to be in teenagers born female who want to transition to males.
  • Alert Arousal Syndrome No Cause for Shame, Doctors Say PGAD, in which a person feels repeatedly sexually aroused without provocation, has been considered an extremely rare and embarrassing condition, one that has been the punchline of jokes even by doctors.
  • Mediterranean Diet Repeats as Best Overall of 2020 WW (fomerly Weight Watchers) took the honor for best weight loss diet and best commercial diet. The Ornish Diet (low in fat, refined carbs, and animal protein) was named best heart-healthy diet.
  • Air Travelers in Denver, L.A. Warned About Measles Public health officials in Los Angeles and Denver are warning people who passed through airports in those cities on Wednesday, Dec. 11, that they may been exposed to measles.
  • Blue Light Glasses: Helpful or Just Hype? More people are turning to blue light glasses to block the light from digital screens. But do the glasses really work?
  • FCC Approves 988 as Suicide Hotline Number The FCC hopes that the new 3-digit number 988 will make it easier for people to get help when they are having suicidal thoughts.
  • Collagen: 'Fountain of Youth' or Edible Hoax? Used by Chinese women for centuries to maintain youthful appearance, the collagen supplement market in the United States is expected to reach $293 million in 2020. Some clinicians remain skeptical.
  • Blood Tests Show Exposure to Ethylene Oxide Test showed the first biologic evidence that living near a facility that emits ethylene oxide increases a person's body burden of the chemical, which has been linked to breast and blood cancers.
  • FDA Investigating Metformin for Possible Carcinogen The Food and Drug Administration has begun testing samples of metformin for NDMA. The fourth most-prescribed drug in the US, metformin is generally the first medication prescribed for type 2 diabetes.
  • New Shingles Vaccine: What You Need to Know The shingles vaccine Shingrix was approved in 2017. Doctors say they are learning more about how it works, its safety risks, and how it compares to Zostavax.
  • Lab Worker Infected With Smallpox-Related Virus The 26-year-old was injecting a mouse with the vaccina virus (VACV) when the needle pricked her finger. It swelled and turned black, but after getting treatment, she recovered. The CDC was contacted.
  • First African American Face Transplant Performed Robert Chelsea suffered burns in 2013. In 2015, the United Network of Organ Sharing began a new allocation system aimed at a more racially equitable selection process of who receives a transplant.
  • Theme Park Thermal Camera Helps Spot Breast Cancer In 2017, the FDA warned health care providers and thermography device makers not to mislead people into believing thermal imaging could take the place of a mammogram.
  • Measles Devastates Families, Challenges Doctors The most recent measles outbreak, which was the worst in the U.S. since 1992, may be over, but the impact of the disease is not.
  • Bernie Sanders Treated for Blocked Artery Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is recovering after being treated for a blocked artery.
  • Amazon Rainforest Fires: Effects on Health, Weather The Amazon rainforest fires that have been blazing out of control in Brazil for weeks could have far-reaching effects on our health, experts warn.
  • Public Health Officials Warn About Eastern Equine Encephalitis Medical officials are warning residents about the rare but deadly eastern equine encephalitis virus, a mosquito-borne virus that can cause brain swelling and leads to death in about 30% of cases.
  • CBD as a Superbug Antibiotic? Cannabidiol, or CBD, already being researched and used for anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy and pain, may be the next superbug fighter for resistant infections, a new study suggests.
  • Doctors Expected a Brain Tumor. It Was a Tapeworm The Middletown, New York woman, 42, was diagnosed with neurocysticercosis, a rare parasitic infection of the brain that can develop if a person swallows the eggs of the pork tapeworm.