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Figures for:
Pulmonary Vasculitis

[Semin Respir Crit Care Med 25(5):483-489, 2004. © 2004 Thieme Medical Publishers]


Figure 1. Wegener's granulomatosis. (A) Computed tomographic (CT) scan at the level of the upper lobes shows bilateral noncavitating nodules (arrows) in the apical regions of both lungs and a cavitating nodule in the left apex. (B) CT scan at the level of main stem bronchi shows multiple cavitating and noncavitating nodules mainly in the subpleural and peribronchovascular regions. The patient was a 50-year-old man.

Figure 2. Wegener's granulomatosis. Computed tomographic scan image at the level of the right main pulmonary artery shows poorly defined bilateral ground glass opacities and a cavitating nodule (arrow) in the right middle lobe. The ground-glass opacities were due to diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. The patient was a 53-year-old man.

Figure 3. Wegener's granulomatosis. Computed tomographic scan image at the level of the inferior pulmonary veins shows bilateral areas of consolidation in a peribronchovascular distribution. The patient was a 35-year-old woman.

Figure 4. Takayasu's arteritis. Computed tomographic image obtained following intravenous administration of contrast demonstrates thickening and enhancement of the wall of the aorta at the level of the aortic arch (arrows). The patient was a 32-year-old woman.

Figure 5. Churg-Strauss Syndrome. (A) Computed tomographic (CT) scan at the level of the inferior pulmonary veins shows patchy bilateral areas of consolidation involving mainly the peripheral regions of the lower lobes. (B) CT scan at the level of the right hemidiaphragm shows bronchial wall thickening (arrows) and patchy peripheral areas of consolidation in the lower lobes. The patient was a 52-year-old man.

Figure 6. Churg-Strauss Syndrome. (A) Posteroanterior chest radiograph shows small bilateral lower lobe consolidation, linear opacities, and small pleural effusions. (B) Computed tomographic image at the level of the carina demonstrates smooth thickening of the interlobular septa (arrows). The patient was a 69-year-old woman with no clinical or echocardiographic evidence of left heart failure. The septal thickening was due to pulmonary involvement.

Figure 7. Behçet's disease. Computed tomographic image at the level of the superior pulmonary veins demonstrates circumferential nonocclusive thrombus within an aneurysm of the right interlobar artery (arrows). The patient was a 48-year-old man.

Figure 8. Goodpasture's syndrome. (A) Computed tomographic (CT) image at the level of the aortic arch shows centrilobular ground-glass opacities throughout the upper lobes due to diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. (B) CT image at the level of the right main pulmonary artery shows ground-glass opacities in the lower lobes. The patient was a 35-year-old woman.