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Tables for:
Antibiotic Selection and Hospital Discharge of Patients With Cellulitis

[Infect Med 21(8):381-389, 2004. © 2004 Cliggott Publishing, Division of CMP Healthcare Media]


Table 1. Patient Demographics


 Patients receiving
cefazolin
Patients receiving
ceftriaxone
P value
Mean age (y)54.3 ± 14.254.7 ± 12.9> .5
Female/male16/3015/31> .5
Race  > .5
   East Asian87 
   White1614 
   Polynesian1013 
   Multiracial1211 
   Black01 
Comorbidity (any)78%85%> .5
   Obesity2520 
   Diabetes2028 
   Venous insufficiency157 
   Renal insufficiency76 
   Peripheral vascular disease11 
   Previous bypass graft41 
   None159 
Location of cellulitis  > .5
   Upper extremity45 
   Lower extremity3939 
   Head21 
   Abdomen11 
Initial white blood cell count11,800 ± 4800/µL12,300 ± 5300/µL> .5
Days of OPAT*
(number of patients)
3.5 ± 1.3 (16)3.4 ± 0.9 (39)> .5

OPAT, outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.
*Includes patients without resistant bacteria who were successfully discharged on a regimen of OPAT.


Table 2. Clinical Outcomes


 Patients receiving
cefazolin
Patients receiving
ceftriaxone
P value
Immediate discharge/total18/46 (39%)45/46 (98%)< .0001
Cured/total*16/18 (89%)39/45 (87%)> .5

*Includes all patients successfully discharged on a regimen of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.


Table 3. Resolution of Erythema and Leukocytosis


 Patients receiving
cefazolin
Patients receiving
ceftriaxone
All patients*P value
Time to 50% decrease in area of erythema2.9 days3.4 days3.4 days.51
Time to 50% decrease in intensity of erythema3.7 days3.2 days3.5 days.45
Mean time to resolution of leukocytosis and fever2 days2 days2 days.94

*Includes patients who were successfully discharged on a regimen of cefazolin or ceftriaxone and those who could not be discharged on a regimen of cefazolin and were switched to ceftriaxone; excludes those with resistant organisms.
P values are derived from comparison of cefazolin and ceftriaxone patient groups only.