Which vaccinations are used to prevent Shigella infection?

Updated: Apr 03, 2018
  • Author: Jaya Sureshbabu, MBBS, MRCPCH(UK), MRCPI(Paeds), MRCPS(Glasg), DCH(Glasg); Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD  more...
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Answer

Once someone has had Shigella infection, they are not likely to become infected with that specific type again for at least several years. However, they can still become infected with other types of Shigella. Presumably, this immunity could be due to secretory IgA. Circulating antibodies can be detected in immune individuals.

Presently, no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved vaccines are available. However, research is underway to develop live oral vaccines to prevent shigellosis. [33, 34] Three approaches to Shigella vaccine development that are under active investigation are (1) parenteral O–specific polysaccharide conjugate vaccine, (2) nasal proteasomes delivering Shigella lipopolysaccharide, and (3) live attenuated invasive Shigella deletion mutants that are administered orally.

Researchers have launched an early-stage human clinical trial of two related candidate vaccines to prevent infection with Shigella. The trial is being conducted at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, one of the eight NIAID-funded Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units in the United States funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). [35]


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